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tom flanagan child porn comments

Tom Flanagan is back. About a year ago, the former adviser to Prime Minister Stephen Harper became persona non grata among
A Saskatoon judge rebutted Tom Flanagan's controversial remarks about child pornography while sentencing a man to prison
My experiences as a prisoner give me a perspective that I have not seen in the furor following Tom Flanagan's comments on the subject of pornography. In the circumstances, his apology should be accepted, and he should not have been dismissed by the CBC, the Globe and Mail or from any other affiliations. His critics have made practically no distinction between those who derive pleasure from looking at child pornography privately and passively, and those who sexually assault children. This society's concern about pedophilia should not be taken to such extent that insensitive remarks become an instant race to stone verbal offenders to death before they can utter their abject recantations.
Arguments got heated this week in the wake of a YouTube video showing academic Tom Flanagan saying that the viewing of child pornography does not "harm another person," and that he "has some grave doubts about putting people in jail because of their taste in pictures." It's frustrating that the incident has been cast simplistically as Flanagan revealing himself to be "okay with child porn." As inelegantly as he went about it, Flanagan seemed to be trying to get at a legitimate question: Is criminalizing the act of viewing evidence, after the fact, of a disgusting crime a reasonable curtailment of freedom expression?
Tom Flanagan, a former adviser to Stephen Harper, expressed support for the freedom to watch child pornography during a talk