HuffPost Canada closed in 2021 and this site is maintained as an online archive. If you have questions or concerns, please check our FAQ or contact support@huffpost.com.

Trans-Pacific Partnership

Canada has a long history of building energy pipelines, but attitudes toward major energy pipeline projects have changed over time.
Some may argue that the world is a lot more complicated today, which is why we need more complicated trade deals, but this is simply false.
Never has there been a better time to rebrand Canada as the model for economic growth in this century.
We should all welcome the federal government's announcement last week signalling that it wants to continue a mutually beneficial relationship with Boeing.
The Trans-Pacific Partnership is a fundamentally flawed trade deal that puts much at risk in Canada, with little to offer Canada's economy in return.
Canada recently signed on to a plan pushed by Japan and New Zealand to resuscitate the TPP despite the U.S. withdrawal. Under jointly negotiated TPP rules, there can no deal unless both the U.S. and Japan agree to it. Well, the U.S. didn't agree. And yet, the TPP lives on after Canada and the other 10 remaining countries voted to discuss reviving the deal.
Looks like the deal could go ahead without the U.S.
For as much as a government wishes to enact progressive policies, trade agreements -- such as the Canada-EU Economic and Trade Agreement (CETA) and the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) -- curtail their abilities to redistribute income and legislate for the common interest. These deals are vectors of inequality.
Canada would be one of the most-affected countries in a Trump-fueled crisis, credit rating agency says.
Renegotiating NAFTA is job one for the Trump administration.
It was one of the world's most ambitious trade deals.
During the last federal election, the Liberals promised more free votes in the House so MPs could more effectively represent their constituents. The TPP is an issue that demands our representation. It will affect every Canadian, but will have specific and diverse impacts on different parts of the country.
The TPP is all but dead. And following the stunning October 14 vote in Belgium, it seems CETA may very well be on its deathbed. This is a huge blow against the big business agenda of the Justin Trudeau Liberals. Sadly, Canadian unions and the New Democratic Party can take little credit for it.
Trade is not something we are afraid of. It is not something we oppose. But we are afraid of the sorts of rules contained within trade agreements that establish more rights for corporations. Agreements like CETA and the TPP are pushing the world in the wrong direction.
There is no look at intellectual property rights and what the deal means for drug prices or the potential for setting up a much-needed Pharmacare program in this country. The impact on supply management, and what that means for dairy farmers, processors and the milk we drink is only partially addressed.
Our current first-past-the-post (FPTP) electoral system has regularly awarded 100 per cent power to one of Canada's two established "centrist" political parties -- the Liberal Party or the Conservative Party(formerly, Progressive Conservative Party) -- even when their share of the popular vote has been well below 50 per cent of total votes cast, nationwide.
We hear often that Canada is a trading nation and that, without trade agreements such as the Trans Pacific Partnership (TPP) and the Comprehensive Economic and Trade Agreement (CETA) with Europe, we will lose access to 800 million consumers and 40 per cent of the world economy.
Trade between Japan and Canada has stagnated for over a decade. Exports from Canada to Japan grew only four per cent from 2006 to 2015, while Canada's imports from Japan have declined. There is good news -- foreign investment from both sides show an upwards trend -- but business will need help to capitalize on this opportunity.
It is the Investor State Dispute Settlement (ISDS) system that would give corporations the right to sue governments for passing laws that hurt their ability to earn a profit -- even if those laws are in the public interest. Think about that. A government gets elected to pass the laws that its citizens want -- and then gets sued under an international trade agreement for doing exactly what it was elected to do. Think that won't happen? It already has.