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trick-or-treat

There is no shortage of costumes to purchase in our local department or online. However, using your imagination to create your DIY Halloween costume not only engages you and your little one's imagination but can also help you be a little more green this Halloween.
Keep Halloween safe for everyone!
Parents often think of adolescence as a time of simply putting up with the annoying and irresponsible behaviours of youth
How early is too early to head out? Alyson Schafer provides some Halloween etiquette.
Condo and apartment dwellers, take note!
Getting ready for a gluten-free, peanut-free or anything else free Halloween just needs a little more diligence from you with a little extra planning and some close attention to candy ingredients so no one you love gets tricked by treats!
So when the traditional North American holidays roll around, don't expect me to sanitize them. I don't expect my brother-in-law to dial down Hannukah thinking I'd find it offensive. I don't expect my mayor to skip Eid because I don't celebrate it. I look forward to the Chinese New Year parade and so do my kids. They shouldn't stop it because I'm not Chinese.
Candy can also have a darker side for parents who are trying to keep their kids as healthy as possible, or protect them from allergic reactions by restricting what candy their kids can have. Imagine how the kid feels when they have a food allergy and can't have candy -- seeing other kids reaping the benefits of their trick-or-treating, dumping out their huge bags of candy and sorting through what they got -- it's both sad and frustrating.
It's fair to say that many teens love getting something for nothing. Free candy? It fits the bill. And every October 31, they fail to disappoint, showing up at the door, thrusting a bag in the direction of unwitting participants, sometimes without even uttering the agreed request -- sometimes, the words "Trick or Treat" aren't even mentioned.
Obviously I'm not going to try to convince my kids NOT to dress up and miss out on an experience that they look forward to with friends. I'm also not the house that hands out toothbrushes or apples in an effort to deprive the neighbourhood kids of their sugar conquest (no crying on my stoop, thank you).
In reality, Halloween produces more boos, eeks, screeches and ding dongs than we should tolerate. From the toxic candy, to the phthalate-laced costumes and the insane amount of waste generated, it's challenging to consider it good, clean fun. Thankfully there are a few things we can do to make sure our kids don't hate us, and our neighbours, family and friends don't ridicule us.
Perhaps by now you've seen the letter handed out by a woman in North Dakota to children she deems to be "moderately obese" who she thinks shouldn't be consuming candy this Halloween. There are so many things wrong with this I hardly know where to start.
It's almost All Hallow's Eve and people from age three to age 99 will be dressing up in costume, eating candy, and partying the night away on this spooky, festive occasion. Most people know the history of Halloween at this point but here are five random facts about Halloween you just might not know.
Growing up, there was nothing more satisfying than opening your trick or treating pillow case to find piles and piles of
Kids have started getting excited about the bounty of candy they'll be getting and their parents are getting anxious. There is so much focus being put on the issue of obesity recently that we have become terrified of every calorie and fat gram we consume and are unfortunately, passing this fear on to our kids.
For many children, Halloween is one of the most anticipated days of the year. Not only do they get to dress up as ghouls
In the 2004 teen flick Mean Girls, there's a joke about teenage girls and Halloween. Lindsay Lohan's protagonist Cady makes