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urban planning

Instead of simply telling people to spend more time exercising, we can incorporate it into their everyday lives.
It's not a job for one man or woman, it requires a team of expert leaders.
Single-detached houses in the 416 are getting hard to come by - equally in terms of affordability and supply. This new reality has given rise to different forms of high-density housing, which the Canadian Home Builders' Association refers to as "missing middle" housing.
For the doubters out there, Toronto's housing landscape is proof that Darwin's theory of evolution is, in fact, the real deal. As single-detached houses join the list of endangered species here in the 416, we're seeing the emergence of new forms of high-density housing, made to survive this storm of rising prices and dwindling supply, all by virtue of their very design.
Something happened in Toronto's housing market over the past year that really shouldn't happen in a free market. As home prices shot through the roof, the number of homes being built in the city dropped dramatically. Vancouver seems to be experiencing a similar problem. So what's going on here? Why is the supply of housing not keeping up with demand, even though there is so much money to be made? The answer, according to a growing number of experts, is that local policies and public opposition to development are killing off home construction, causing home prices to skyrocket.
The American elections are increasingly relevant to Canada. The dominant urban discourse is self-centered and dismissive of others whose economic and demographic realities have pushed them out of the unaffordable urban housing markets. The elites have willingly become ignorant of what transpires in remote small towns like Thunder Bay whose survival is linked to the consumers and commuters in large towns.
In less than 10 years, near-zero emissions homes and buildings will be the new normal in Vancouver. In addition to reducing emissions and energy use, the city's Zero Emissions Building Plan will lead to improvements in the quality of homes and buildings. This plan will be an important catalyst in the local, clean, low-carbon economy.
City planners and developers need to realize that building a good mixture of home types for people of different incomes and ages, with amenities for people at all stages of their life, is what make a stable, healthy, vibrant city, and one where people want to, and are able to, stay and thrive.
A successful public transit project is one that achieves a sustainable and sufficient ridership that could not be served by less expensive modes. The mere provision of trains operating devoid of riders is not a success but a failure resulting from putting 'progress' ahead of the process.
Currently 54 per cent of the world's population live in cities -- over 3.5 billion. Cities account for about 70 per cent of energy related greenhouse gas emissions (more per capita than rural areas). And in 2014, global CO2 emissions, which account for approximately 65 per cent of all greenhouse gas emissions, were nearly 36 giga-tonnes.
If you're planning on buying or renting a condo, here's an important lesson: purchase prices and rents will be higher the closer you are to major transit hubs such as subway stations. Sure, it's convenient to be located adjacent to a subway stop, but it'll cost you. How much? You'd be surprised.
Considering the environment never receives much discussion around election time, it should come as no surprise that the topic of urban tree cover is buried deep in the forest of political discourse, under a layer of heavy brush. However, I believe a big part of our national identity is tied to the environment, and our leaders should strive to improve the health of our communities and the Canadians who live in them.
If we disconnect from the natural world, we become disconnected from who we are -- to the detriment of our health and the health of the ecosystems on which our well-being and survival depend. Understanding that we're part of nature and acting on that understanding makes us healthier and happier, and encourages us to care for the natural systems around us.
Agrihoods can also be potentially profitable, partly by attracting buyers and appreciating property values. Agritopia is not only self-sustaining, but actually generates revenue by selling produce to upscale restaurants and chefs.
The legacy debate this week is now about whether the Pan Am Games will lead Toronto to an Olympic bid. The reality is it doesn't matter. Toronto has already won by hosting a pan-American event that has taught us we can make this city any way we choose.
Gentrification can crowd out, or displace, communities (typically ethnic) and social networks whilst newcomers transform the very character of our vibrant communities. It is a blow to low-income residents who often move out or stay behind only to pay higher rents. Our hidden agenda is not so hidden: Sustainable gentrification triggered by planned urban development -- not a brazen force blindly driven by dollars--that protects the most vulnerable in our communities long after the Pan Am athletes pack their bags.
On June 10, the Toronto City Council will vote on the future of the eastern section of the Gardiner Expressway. Many councillors are still undecided. If the council were to rely on evidence and facts, it would vote for the Hybrid option because it serves the welfare of millions more Torontonians than the Remove (8-lane Boulevard) option.
When you buy a house the first thing your eye goes to is the sticker price. But buying a home comes with a major hidden cost that doesn't show up in the MLS report: Transportation costs could more than eat up the savings of a lower-priced home in the suburbs. The concept is called location efficiency and it's the amount of time, energy and greenhouse gas emissions you spend getting from where you live to the workplace as well as your other frequent trips. And location efficiency may be the secret sauce to saving money and getting that house in the neighborhood you never thought you could afford.
Communities are comprised of a diverse mix of people, functions, and uses. The built form that we give to communities helps to foster connections and communication: it becomes the stage for our culture.
The GO Transit network has sufficient capacity in the non-peak direction of travel during peak periods, and in both directions during off-peak periods. The government should offer free GO service in off-peak periods and in the non-peak direction during the peak period. The Pan Am Games should bring the City together in a mass celebration of the human spirit. The current plans require people to stay away or at home, which is against the very spirit of the Games. Let's plan better to have fun at the Games.