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voter apathy

The more you vote, the more politicians will feel like they have to listen to you.
Our election hub, Change #Elxn42, shows that some of the biggest trending petitions speak to the top issues the party leaders are taking on: clean energy, pharmacare, Syrian refugees, missing and murdered indigenous women, and Canada Post, to name just a few.
We're sorry to have to be the ones who tell you.
"Get people to vote by reaching them through their stomachs, rather than just talking politics."
Notorious bad boy, Russell Brand, may have recently started a revolution. Or not. In his interview with BBC journalist Jeremy Paxman, Brand expressed his frustration with the status quo and explained why he's never voted in his entire life. He did so with intelligence and disarming charm.The trouble, however, with Russell Brand's call for a revolution is, while it may speak to people because it sounds terribly dangerous and sexy in a "fuck-it-all, let's start from scratch" kind of way, it offers no real solutions. It's not by rejecting democracy that you create change, because, in a democracy, change can only happen within the system.
Our elected officials need to spend any chance they get talking to our children about the importance of voting and how lucky we are to have the right to vote. Taking even just a few minutes out of one's schedule to speak to a group of students and answer their questions can make a huge impact in the future.
I'm told that 30 is a big step in the long march from an idealistic youth to a staunchly conservative mid-life. I'm pretty sure I won't become any less idealistic in my approaching dotage. I will still advocate for these same policies; the only difference being that as an adult my opinions are taken seriously. Why do we have such low expectations for young people?
Can we engage voters -- especially young people already prone to apathy and boredom? In this age of infotainment and indifference, everyone is worried about what young people will do at the polls Tuesday. Or if, in fact, they'll show up at all -- even though it's easier than ever to become engaged.
I wasn't too busy. I didn't forget. I wasn't even one of those principled abstainers who dutifully spoil a ballot in vague protest. I just didn't bother voting. I know my view is not popular, but I doubt I'm the only one.