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voters

As a progressive voter, it was disappointing to watch the press conference announcing the federal approval of Petronas' Pacific Northwest LNG project, an industrial project that would trample the rights and title of First Nations and make it virtually impossible for B.C. to meet greenhouse gas emission targets.
Anyone who signs up with the Liberals (with no membership fee involved) will have the right to take part in policy development, nomination meetings, conventions and future elections of the leader. The Conservatives have gone in the opposite direction to the Liberals with their new $25 membership fee that has to be paid by cheque or credit card. In effect the Conservatives have managed to make themselves more exclusive rather than inclusive. The Liberals have broadened their tent while the Conservatives shrank theirs. Time will tell who made the right move.
The Liberal Party of Canada changed the way that it chose its leader by introducing the free, "supporter" category for new members. The move was viewed by some as dangerous. What the party faithful may not have realized was that the Liberals were kicking off a grassroots strategy that would strengthen the party.
A Vancouver teacher's Facebook post on the matter has been shared more than 21,000 times.
Our election hub, Change #Elxn42, shows that some of the biggest trending petitions speak to the top issues the party leaders are taking on: clean energy, pharmacare, Syrian refugees, missing and murdered indigenous women, and Canada Post, to name just a few.
Friendly reminder: 39 per cent of eligible Canadians chose "no one" in the last federal election.
It's well known that people who consume news media are more likely to be civically and politically engaged, but where people get their news has now shifted. With more and more people opting to search for news not only online, but on social media platforms, politicians and their teams are now faced with the challenge (and opportunity) of being in that space and using it appropriately.
The current trajectories of Canada's predominant political economies are increasingly dysfunctional, due in no small part to the fact that we have become, in many respects, a petro state, rather than the much vaunted "Energy Superpower" that we were promised.