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whistleblowers

Canada was chastised for ignoring its own legal requirement for periodic reviews of the effectiveness of its whistleblower law.
After three decades, and four prime ministers, stronger whistleblowing legislation remains a pipe dream.
Those who step forward deserve protection for “doing the right thing.”
Even Liberal MPs say whistleblowers aren’t protected under the current system.
Public servants need to jump many hurdles to expose potential wrongdoing.
Sam Anderson says she lost her job after calling out Hootsuite’s $1.5 million deal with ICE.
Marineland has launched lawsuits targeting myself, former orca trainer Christine Santos and animal care supervisor Jim Hammond. My latest round of legal bills totaled more than I will earn in this year -- $100,000. Our lawsuits are shining examples of the urgent need for the anti-SLAPP legislation that is Bill 52: Protection of Public Participation Act. It is unbearable to think that this historic piece of legislation -- as it is currently written -- will not apply to the very people who have largely inspired it. Why is the province turning its back on us and leaving us behind? Where is the procedural fairness for those of us who are already proceeding with unfair cases before the courts in Ontario?
In all of my interviews with directors over the years, when I ask about a director's greatest regret the answer is consistently, "I should have spoken up when I had the chance." Chances are several of your colleagues are thinking the exact same thing.
Call it what you want bad damage control or poor deflection, but one thing is certain: the Ministry of Health's attempts to put those 2012 firings behind them aren't working out so well.
Vaccine refusals are reaching epidemic proportions in many communities in the U.S., with large numbers of parents defying
Merck now faces federal charges of fraud from the whistleblowers, a vaccine competitor and doctors in New Jersey and New York. Merck could also need to defend itself in Congress: The staff of representative Bill Posey (R-Fla) -- a longstanding critic of the CDC interested in an alleged link between vaccines and autism -- is now reviewing some 1,000 documents that the CDC whistleblower turned over to them.
Passing legislation to protect whistleblowers is critical in the fight to end corruption and collusion. And that's the point I'll be making on behalf of the 25,500 members of Syndicat de professionnelles et professionnels du gouvernement du Québec (SPGQ), in my talk at the Peoples' Social Forum.
We've learned an incredible amount about how governments scheme, conspire, collude, connive and lie, both to each other and to the people who elected them. Which is why my nomination for the next Nobel Peace Prize is WikiLeaks and its three great whistleblowers -- Julian Assange, Bradley Manning and Edward Snowden.
In a society that values liberty, a whistleblower should be a hero. A whistleblower should not be forced to choose between their personal well-being and coming forward. Edward Snowden's insider announcement on the scope of the NSA's ability to gather, archive, and analyze information should come as no shock to the more cynical among us. It was easy enough to assume, but now we're staring down the truth of it. If we don't find a way to pressure the powers that be to give up some of their hidden power, contrary to all of their self-aggrandizing instincts, we're in for a very stark decline into a classically dystopian future.
Perhaps if more insiders had come forward to expose wrongdoing, and irregularities at the major U.S. banks and investment houses a few years ago, the impact of the financial meltdown leading to the Great Recession might have been softened. Until each one of us does this, we're all muppets.