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wikileaks

"The circumstances in this case have changed," Sweden’s deputy director of prosecutions says.
He's been living in the Ecuadorian embassy in the U.K. since 2012.
Trump probably didn’t mean to invite hackers to target him and his allies and post their findings on WikiLeaks.
Advisor Kellyanne Conway said that Trump will not release his tax returns after all, despite his campaign pledge to do so.
Image of "Vladimir Putin carrying his buddy Donald Trump" by DonkeyHotey on flickr through Creative Commons It has yet to
Is it collusion, corruption or just plain incompetence? That answer will likely play out over time if there is a public demand for accountability. In the meantime, Canadians need a plan to make sure that our leaders understand what we have known for a while -- the tax system is neither fair nor doing an adequate job.
The Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) negotiations have attracted considerable attention in Canada in recent weeks as the political consequences of dismantling agricultural protections loom large with a national elections scheduled for the fall.
Just days after a number of provincial health ministers advocated for the creation of a national pharmacare program, a leaked
There's nothing wrong with raising concerns about respect for privacy with regard to certain commercial practices. But the quantity and quality of data collected, the use to which they are put, and the potential violations of respect for privacy have nothing in common with those of governments and their spy agencie
“There's an exodus of national security reporters,” Wikileaks' infamous leader Julian Assange told thousands at SXSW's interactive
Now, our friends in Australia are sounding the alarm about how the Trans-Pacific Partnership could wreak havoc on Canada's economy. Australians know well the economic damage that unbalanced and extreme Internet censorship rules can cause.
A trade agreement Canada intends to sign will have “far-reaching implications for individual rights and civil liberties,” WikiLeaks
How often have you seen a 12-part newspaper investigation into government corruption or an ongoing TV news investigation into fraudulent business practices? They simply don't exist anymore. Now daily papers operate solely on a 24-hour news cycle which leaves no time for pursuing the deeper story.
2013-08-12-blog_spotlight_on_tiff_v01.jpg So much for all the buzz around The Fifth Estate, Bill Condon's frustratingly flat dramatization of the formation, triumphs, and sundering of WikiLeaks, the anarchist information-sharing website. Relying on tight close-ups and lengthy speeches, there is a distinctly made-for-TV feel to the proceedings which even great performances couldn't have overcome. But sadly, the biggest misstep falls on the shoulders of Benedict Cumberbatch.
Critics haven't been very kind to the Wikileaks/Julian Assange movie The Fifth Estate thus far. But ignoring the way the movie addresses the issue, and instead focusing on its message, might be the best way to look at it.
Long ago TIFF went from showcasing great movies to premiering great movies that matter. This year's opening-night gala promises to be a landmark occasion for the film world and society at large. The Toronto International Film Festival landed the world premiere of The Fifth Estate, a movie about WikiLeaks and its controversial founder Julian Assange.
We've learned an incredible amount about how governments scheme, conspire, collude, connive and lie, both to each other and to the people who elected them. Which is why my nomination for the next Nobel Peace Prize is WikiLeaks and its three great whistleblowers -- Julian Assange, Bradley Manning and Edward Snowden.
Our government may say that we're engaging the Saudis to foster reform in the kingdom. Apartheid South Africa's allies made similar arguments, calling for "constructive engagement" with the racist regime. Thankfully, Canada rejected that approach and led the world on sanctions, which hastened the end of apartheid.
According to Mashable, Aaron Swartz may have been a source for Wikileaks. If looked at in light of the U.S. vendetta against Wikileaks, their extreme overreaction to Swartz's "copyright violations" involving academic journals suddenly makes sense. The Government's response to Wikileaks has been nothing less than rabid.
So there I am in my last column agonizing over whether Canada should ban that obscene and hateful Internet video called Innocence of Muslims, when it occurs to me that it might be a really good idea to come up with an example of freedom of speech in action. Something easily understandable. Something vivid. Something gutsy.