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wireless

The laureates helped develop a wireless world, the committee said.
Only Iceland and Norway perform more quickly on mobile, a report says.
Major competitors are against the idea of being forced to lease their networks in a bid to reduce prices for consumers.
But all our big cities are doing pretty well.
"The digital divide is unacceptable."
People aren't impressed with Rogers and Bell.
Canada's wireless market just isn't competitive enough, critics say.
Canada ranks behind Poland, ahead of Chile on mobile subscriptions.
As the CEO of a Product testing company, I'm always on the lookout for products that are as practical as they are stylish (whenever possible) to satisfy both me and my kids. I totally get that spending hours researching what is hot right now might not be an option for most, so I have taken the guesswork out of it I've compiled a list of some of the products I am most excited about for Back-to-School.
Canadians aren't aware of a CRTC decision that makes more competition less likely.
Like millions of other cell phone users, I've had to suffer the trials and tribulations of my phone company's customer service or what might more accurately be called their customer disservice. It all started with a text message to my daughter Sarah's phone informing her that she had reached 100 per cent usage for our shared 3 GB data plan.
There's a lot at stake here -- if Canada continues on the path the current government has set it on, then harmful policies on surveillance, Internet censorship, and Big Telecom dominance could be locked in place for a generation, and hold back our digital economy. Canadians deserve better.
Unlimited wireless plans have been slow to arrive in Canada, but now one group of telecom customers will be able to talk
Customers of Wind Mobile in Toronto will be able to do something that customers of the big telecom companies won’t, at least
you may not live in the U.S., but many of your favourite websites do. In the end, rules that impact those sites will eventually impact you. And as countries around the world continue to contemplate net neutrality rules, it will be important to show the leadership of Canada's CRTC, the United States' FCC, and others to urge policy-makers around the globe to follow suit.
If you're an enormous telecom conglomerate, and you release a new app to unfavourable ratings, what do you do? You could invest some of your vast resources into listening to customers and making the app better -- or you could get your senior managers to leave fake reviews to mislead customers and fluff up your ratings instead.
A company can still offer three-year deals if it wants to, but they are no longer permitted to enforce those deals with cancellation fees. They would be three-year deals in name only, therefore no company offers them, and consumers have fewer options than they did before. One result of this regulatory change: higher up-front prices for your new phone.
Mr. Moore, Mr. Harper, Mr. Blais, we have given the large carriers our trust. And they have abused it. It's now up to you -- we need you to work together to ensure that our networks are open to content producers, to innovative service providers, and most of all, to ordinary Canadian citizens. We need more than tweets, more than press releases and pamphlets. We are asking for a firm commitment to ensure that the large network operators will no longer be artificially favoured over upstart innovators and competitors, a commitment to providing Canadians with a bright and lasting digital future.
Over the last year, we've seen the CRTC publish customer-friendly new rules for wireless, set up a special task force to investigate extortionate roaming fees, and start a conversation with Canadians about the Future of Television (and watching TV content online!) Things are starting to change.
Will the government cave under this pressure? We're hoping they won't -- after all, they've made a clear promise to Canadians to lower prices, a promise underlined personally by Prime Minister Harper at his party's convention last fall. We intend to hold the government to its promises. But already there are worrying signs, with Industry Minister Moore seemingly changing his tune.