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Women In Tech

On International Women's Day, when countless statistics will be cited and discussed to highlight how far we've come towards gender equality, there's one number that keeps me awake at night. Twenty-one. Despite our best efforts as an incubator for tech startups in Canada, only 21 per cent of our founders are women.
Did you know that the mathematician who calculated the trajectories for NASA's Apollo 11 flight to the Moon was an African-American woman? Her name is Katherine Johnson. Thanks to the movie Hidden Figures, her story, and that of two other brilliant African-American women, Dorothy Vaughan and Mary Jackson, is finally being told.
Enough with the patronizing comments already.
The lack of women in STEM reflects on a country's economy: there is a rising demand for STEM-related workers, and ignoring women would be cutting off half of the possible workforce. In addition, women in STEM make more money, which enhances their purchasing power, which is both good for them and the national economy.
Some of Canada's biggest success stories show us that if you want to make it big, you've got to move south. Slack, the popular chat application for business teams, was originally founded in Victoria but is now headquartered in San Francisco, where access to capital has helped the company achieve explosive growth. So why-oh-why would anyone want to live and work in Vancouver?
The technology industry is a diverse field that offers those working within it opportunities to be creative, to be innovative and to do some truly unique work. But there's one well-documented issue -- technology remains a male-dominated field. This isn't just an issue south of the border.
When it comes to women in tech, we know there needs to be a shift in attitude. Especially for females first entering and aiming to follow a progressive career path. While many emerging into the industry from technology programs worldwide, once in their field, there is still little advancement into upper management positions.
Anjali Ramachandran is the head of innovation at PHD UK in London. She's the co-founder of Ada's List, a group for women who work in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics, and she also writes about innovation in the developing world.
The answer to empower the next generation of men and women entrepreneurs, innovators and their ideas by putting real-world challenges in front of them and not limiting creativity is expanding and supporting the culture of STEM initiatives.
Unfortunately, women remain underrepresented in the tech sector. Research shows that women make up only between 10 per cent and 20 per cent of tech-related jobs at tech companies. Why should women and girls learn to code? Here are a few reasons.
In September, I attended the Ontario University Fair, one of the biggest university fairs on the continent. There, I spent
When I was growing up, my parents often told me that I could do anything that I wanted. There should be no closed doors on my career aspirations. I grew up around women who were researchers, professionals and innovative in their respective fields.
I teamed up with Diply and Tech Alley of ISP Canada and we took sex-tech to a whole new level that neither of them thought was accessible. We 3D-printed a ribbed for your pleasure (as expected) blue dildo, and time lapsed the whole thing for your viewing entertainment -- because, that's what I do.
With International Women's Day quickly approaching, I felt it was important to shed a light on why some women in today's society are still feeling held back by barriers that seem to be embedded in professional environments, specifically in Science, Technology, Engineering and Math (STEM).
Having been involved with hEr VOLUTION for the last two years, I know firsthand that there are many men who support women in the STEM sector, whether they are recognized for it or not. HeForShe campaign had made it possible for others to see the benefits of campaigns such as this. DevTO is a great example of a men run tech social monthly meetup.
It is through encouraging girls and young women to test ideas and realize not only the challenges but also the opportunities STEM fields offer in order to be innovative in these fields. How are we going to see such changes take place in Canada?
When we hold executive meetings here at our offices, the room is split 50/50 between women and men around the table. It's not an image that's often seen in our digital technology field and one that needs to become more norm and less exception.
Across the Fortune 500 companies and throughout cities worldwide, women appear to hold the short end of the stick. Women are considerably underrepresented as CEOs, officers, and directors in the corporate world. Since women occupy nearly half the total work force in the United States, what is the reasoning behind these inexplicable labour statistics?
There are worse things he could be addicted to. It could have been drugs, sex, porn, or the Candy Crush Saga. With my husband, who is a straight up sort of guy, it was computer science.
My life has been "busy" and a lot of work for quite some time now, and that's something I don't want to change. I still take the necessary time to unplug and fill myself and my family up, but cannot deny that I also thrive off of creating and growing in business. That will likely always be part of me, even with a new baby at my side. My work is very much tied into what I want to create for my family to benefit from. I have complete respect for the women who grow up with a complete focus on wanting to stay home and raise a family... but for me, part of what I want to represent to my children is showing them that they have the ability to "have it all."