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yemen

Canada shouldn't be seen as a country daring to take the first step against Saudi Arabia, but rather as a bully's friend who said the wrong thing.
The country is experiencing the world's largest epidemic, and it has everything to do with the Arms Trade Treaty.
I believe the stress and fear of the violence caused her health to deteriorate and ultimately led to her death.
Climate change is certainly partly to blame for droughts that destroy crops, kill livestock and dry up rivers. However, the main cause of hunger crises is conflict. If the guns were silenced and humanitarian access were restored, it would save more lives in the short term than the return of the rains and crops.
As the conflict in Yemen enters its third year, families' coping mechanisms are being stretched to their limit, risking a total collapse in resilience.Yemen is now the largest food security emergency in the world. The number of extremely poor and vulnerable people is skyrocketing.
Last week marks two years since the current conflict in Yemen began, a war that has destroyed the economic and social fabric of the country. According to the government, the GDP shrunk nearly 35 per cent when fighting erupted. Infrastructure collapsed. Public institutions continue to struggle to provide even basic services.
As humanitarian partners scale up their response to provide urgent life-saving support to the most vulnerable children and families, we're also left fielding questions about how, once again, the situation could deteriorate to such a point that a formal declaration of famine was made.
Famine has been declared in parts of South Sudan and looms in Nigeria, Somalia and Yemen. Every day children are dying and UNICEF is working with partners to provide life-saving support for children and families. These are the stories of some of the children caught in this crisis.
From Syria to Yemen and Iraq, from South Sudan to Nigeria, children are affected by relentless conflicts and displacement crises, as well as devastation wrought by natural disasters.
Before the conflict in Yemen escalated, 10-year-old Fahd lived peacefully with his family in the northern city of Sa'ada. His routine was to wake up every morning, go to school, play with friends in the evenings and go back home for dinner and do his school homework.