Contributor

Pamela Haag

Author, 'Marriage Confidential'

Pamela Haag is the author of<a href="http://www.marriageconfidential.com" target="_hplink"> Marriage Confidential</a>, a provocative look inside post-millenial marriage. She is a weekly columnist on <a href="http://bigthink.com/blogs/marriage-30" target="_hplink">"Marriage 3.0"</a> at the Big Think magazine, where you can get a glimpse of what goes on in the post-wedding world. See <a href="http://www.marriageconfidential.com" target="_hplink">www.marriageconfidential.com</a> for media, interviews, clips and reviews. See <a href="http://www.pamelahaag.com" target="_hplink">Pamela Haag</a>'s personal website for other writings and information.<br /> <br /> Haag's work spans a wide, and unusual, spectrum, all the way from academic scholarship to memoir. Thematically, it has consistently focused on women's issues, feminism, and American culture, but she’s also written on topics as eclectic as the effort to rebuild the lower Manhattan subway lines after 9/11, 24-hour sports radio talk shows, and the experience of class mobility.<br /> <br /> Haag earned a Ph.D. in history from Yale University in 1995, after graduating with Highest Honors from Swarthmore College. She’s held fellowships from the National Endowment for the Humanities, the Mellon Foundation, and post-doctoral fellowships at both Brown and Rutgers University. As an academic she published scholarly articles and a first book, based on dissertation work, with Cornell University Press in 1999.<br /> <br /> She became the Director of Research for the AAUW Educational Foundation, a national nonprofit based in Washington, DC, that advocates for girls and women. In that capacity she wrote and edited several pieces of research and was the media spokesperson for the research.<br /> <br /> In 2002, Haag became a speechwriter on issues of public transit and transit-oriented development for the secretary of the Federal Transit Administration and, occasionally, the Secretary of Transportation.<br /> <br /> Since 2004, she has been publishing personal and opinion essays in a variety of venues, including National Public Radio, the <em>American Scholar</em>, the <em>Christian Science Monitor</em>, <em>Ms</em>. magazine, <em>The Washington Post</em>, the <em>Chronicle of Higher Education</em>, the <em>Michigan Quarterly Review</em>, <em>New Haven Review</em>, the <em>Antioch Review</em>, the <em>New York Post</em>, and carte blanche. Haag earned an MFA in creative nonfiction from Goucher College in 2008, where she won the Chris White award for best essay, and was also a prizewinner in <em>The Atlantic</em>’s 2008 national nonfiction contest.<br /> <br /> <a href="http://www.amazon.com/Marriage-Confidential-Post-Romantic-Workhorse-Undersexed/dp/0061719285/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&amp;ie=UTF8&amp;qid=1297194086&amp;sr=1-1" target="_hplink">“Marriage Confidential (HarperCollins; May 31, 2011; $25.99) draws on all of these strands of Haag’s unique professional biography to create almost a new genre, a weave of academic expertise, cultural history, creative non-fiction, memoir, storytelling, interviews, and commentary.