Cory Monteith

I don't need to be an addict myself to know that it is poison. Each bag, a bullet. Each snort or injection, the spin of the cylinder. This is our generation's Russian Roulette.
As a writer, I know the words we choose to use matter. The use of derogatory words like "junkie" or "dope fiend" not only greatly affects the addict's psyche, but those who care deeply for them as well.
With so many variables being out of your power, the one thing you are in control of is your well-being. Feeling any of this at any point does not mean you are suddenly a judgmental person who does not understand addiction. All of this does not mean you do not love this person unconditionally.
Tori did not wake up one day and say to herself, "I am going to fall in love with a drug addict," or "I am going to have a child with a drug addict." Many loved ones aren't even aware of the substance abusers' struggles until the lies they put into place in order to hide their habit begin to unravel.
I am not an addict. But try and love one, and then see if you can look me square in the eyes and tell me that you didn't get addicted to trying to fix them. If you're lucky, they recover. If you're really lucky, you recover, too.
During a visit to “The HuffPost Show” on Friday, “Glee” actor Kevin McHale told hosts Roy Sekoff and Marc Lamont Hill that
Even at its rockiest, Glee has had a steadfast message that we are all underdogs, and there is nothing, and no one, we cannot be. There is nothing you can't accomplish with faith, hope, dreams, drive, and a special group of friends.
Goodbyes are never easy, but when it comes to "Glee," Fox wants to keep its farewell short and sweet. Fox Networks Group