Michael Lewis

Barack and Michelle Obama’s production company has optioned Michael Lewis’ book “The Fifth Risk,” but says "it's not a political statement.”
Recent events show just how threatened some men are by women.
An old essay by the "Moneyball" author takes on new relevance.
Flash Boys by Michael Lewis In Michael Lewis's game-changing bestseller, a small group of Wall Street iconoclasts realize
On The Big Short Movie: Lewis described it as "a relief" to see how good the movie was and praised the talent and craftsmanship
Our public securities markets are essential for companies large and small to access capital and for our economy to grow.
If the man who saw the housing market crash and ensuing financial market meltdown is focusing his investments on fresh water, might that be one more reason for us to shift our thinking about the nature, socioeconomic, political and environmental, of water?
I wrestle with what I'm going to tell him about America, and I've been trying to form a plan for engaging America's history - the good, bad, and incredibly ugly -- and talking to him about being "an American" in a healthy and productive way.
The movie The Big Short tells a compelling version of the greatest economic tragedy to hit the country since the Great Depression -- the 2008 financial crash. It also may tell a nightmarish vision of the future.
Both extraordinarily well-made and well-acted films have received Golden Globe nominations for best motion picture screenplay
"The first thing I would do is break up the banks so that they are much smaller and they could all fail."
In his early writings Marx talked alienation caused by the division of labor. If nothing else The Big Short takes this to its logical conclusion in dramatizing an unregulated financial system that has little if nothing to do with the lives of those who actually have to work for a living.
If collateralized debt obligations, mortgage-backed securities and credit-default swaps are your thing, then Adam McKay's The Big Short is for you. If they're not, the film is still for you.
Faced with making a movie revolving around "mortgage-backed securities" and "tranches" and "collateralized debt obligations" play with mainstream audiences is no easy feat, but McKay manages it with remarkable ease.