NYR

Gatti is a coward, but he is not exceptional; Ferrante is exceptional. What he did is so boring that it's a cliché. A woman asserts something as clearly as possible. And a man tells her, no, this is what you really meant.
The New York Review of Books has just brought up that old conundrum of how to deal with the personal evil of great artists. This time around it is the anti-Semitism of T.S.Eliot, the most influential English language poet of the 20th Century. But he is just one of numerous major artists whose moral character was often in inverse proportion to their artistic talent.
America is a Christian country. This is true in a number of senses. Most people, if asked, will identify themselves as Christian
Dr. Michele Olson, professor of exercise science at Auburn University Montgomery said a resolution can be a way of putting
Smith does have a point: Ambition as a personality trait has, in fact, been linked to precisely the opposite of "finding
The documentary succeeds in exalting the publication while examining its effect on individual writers and on certain high
At ninety-five, as a businessman and philanthropist, I want to call attention to little-known ploys in US philanthropy that
It used to feel naive to talk openly about your actions to mitigate climate change. "It's all meaningless" would be the response. Watch now as the questions change from "What can be done?" to "What is being done... and what are you doing?"
Negging out is my new virtue of 2014. It may be the new word of the year once it enters the American English Oxford Dictionary. Someone may end up negging out of the Selfie by then.
I nearly died just after writing the first draft of my second novel. The story is unnerving, possibly amoral, anarchic, and, certainly, nihilistic as hell -- but it still tries to say life is a magnificent and magical journey.