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101-Year-Old Fulfills Dream Of Becoming A U.S. Citizen

Congratulations, Juana!

For anyone who thinks they're too old to make a dream come true, the story of Juana Hernandez proves that it really is never too late. At age 101, the Miami grandmother fulfilled her longtime ambition of becoming an American citizen with a swearing in ceremony Tuesday.

Hernandez, along with 140 others, waved an American flag, sang "The Star-Spangled Banner" and pledged her allegiance to the country. It was a special moment for the centenarian who came to the U.S. in her 90s, just eight years ago, from Honduras. 

"I'm very happy," she told CBS Miami. 

The journey to citizenship wasn't an easy one, with Hernandez having to take a test, file a lengthy application, and pass an interview before getting accepted. 

“Her love for this new country is something I think will be very exciting for everyone involved," U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services section chief Yasser Navarrete told CBS Miami. 

Hernandez wanted to become a citizen in order to petition for her two sons, still in Honduras, to join her in the U.S., she told The Miami Herald last month. 

Congratulations, Juana!

 

  • Nancy Hensel, right, congratulates Juana Hernandez, who is 101 years old and originally from Honduras, as she prepares to be
    Joe Raedle via Getty Images
    Nancy Hensel, right, congratulates Juana Hernandez, who is 101 years old and originally from Honduras, as she prepares to be sworn in as a naturalized U.S. citizen, at the U.S Citizenship and Immigration Services office on Dec. 29, 2015 in Miami, Florida. Juana Hernandez was part of the citizenship ceremony that included 140 others and is the last swearing in service of the year for the Miami office.
  • Juana Hernandez, who is 101 years old and originally from Honduras, holds an American flag as she is sworn in as a naturalize
    Joe Raedle via Getty Images
    Juana Hernandez, who is 101 years old and originally from Honduras, holds an American flag as she is sworn in as a naturalized U.S. citizen.
  •  Maria Rosario Corrales (R) hugs her mother, Juana Hernandez, after she had been sworn in as a naturalized U.S. citizen.
    Joe Raedle via Getty Images
     Maria Rosario Corrales (R) hugs her mother, Juana Hernandez, after she had been sworn in as a naturalized U.S. citizen.
  • Marisela Chopite hugs her mother-in-law, Juana Hernandez.
    Joe Raedle via Getty Images
    Marisela Chopite hugs her mother-in-law, Juana Hernandez.
  • Juana Hernandez holds an American flag as she is sworn in as a naturalized U.S. citizen
    Joe Raedle via Getty Images
    Juana Hernandez holds an American flag as she is sworn in as a naturalized U.S. citizen

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