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7 Ways to Cook a Turkey

You could take the time-saving approach if you want to, or you could go to a little extra trouble and offer your guests something really special.
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Rubbed, stuffed, fried, and roasted -- there are plenty of ways to turn turkey into dinner.

When it comes to cooking your Thanksgiving turkey there are so many options. Gone are the days when it was either roast the bird or go out for dinner. Over the years, talented cooks have experimented and used their imaginations and come up with a host of approaches to ending up with a beautiful bird on the holiday table. You could take the time-saving approach if you want to, or you could go to a little extra trouble and offer your guests something really special.

You could go bold this year and roast your turkey with a rub of garlic, chili powder, cumin, crushed red pepper, and ground coriander. You could brighten the bird with a citrus rub based on lemon and orange zest. You can dress up your turkey by wrapping it in bacon or add a kick by cooking it with beer.

If you're not having loads of people over for Thanksgiving, we even have recipes suitable for smaller crowds. Instead of making the whole turkey, you could make braised turkey legs or stuffed turkey breast. Read on for 25 ways to cook your turkey this Thanksgiving.

Bacon-Wrapped Turkey

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Photo Credit: Shutterstock

Nothing's better than bacon, except when it's Thanksgiving Day and your turkey is wrapped in some. This recipe uses a seasoning and olive oil paste for under the turkey's skin to add a subtle hint of flavor that pairs perfectly with the bacon. -- Anne Dolce

Balsamic-Glazed Roast Turkey with Pan Sauce Recipe

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Photo Credit: Shutterstock

A balsamic vinegar reduction adds a rich caramel sweetness, and a shiny dark sheen, to the roasted bird. -- Lidia Bastianich

Beer-Can Turkey

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Photo Credit: Shutterstock

You'll find that a beer-can turkey is smoky, succulent, tender, and, most of all, mind-blowingly delicious. It'll instantly take the stage for many holidays to come., and you'll finally believe us when we say that it's not just for Thanksgiving, and make it all year round. -- Scott Thomas

Best Turkey Recipe Ever

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Photo Credit: Shutterstock

The pinnacle of the Thanksgiving meal is, of course, the turkey -- and we want to make sure that you are fully equipped and prepared to cook it just right. Don't get wrapped up in Turkey Day chaos. Take a deep breath, relax, and follow this easy recipe to cook a juicy and moist turkey. -- Emily Jacobs

Braised Turkey Legs

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Photo Credit: Shutterstock

This is a great way to prepare turkey legs. Chef Michael Mina adds extra flavor by braising his in chicken stock with flavor-boosting ingredients like bacon, mushrooms, and thyme. -- Cook Taste Eat

Brined and Smoked Thanksgiving Turkey

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Photo Credit: iStock / Thinkstock

I'm proud to say that I've never cooked a turkey the traditional way in my entire life. Here's why: When you break down the whole bird into parts, you can cook each part in the most forgiving and painless way possible. Simply brine and smoke the breast and marinate and braise the legs, and boom -- it's done! When it comes time to serve that bird, you'll be the hero who cooked a juicy, tender Thanksgiving turkey that everyone will talk about for years to come. I'll be damned if anyone cooks a whole turkey again after trying this process. -- Adam Sappington

Cider-Glazed Turkey with Lager Gravy Recipe

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Photo Credit: iStock / Thinkstock

Here's an easy turkey recipe packed with flavor. You can start the lager gravy after you throw the bird in the oven, and the gravy should be done around the same time as the turkey. No fuss. -- Ashton Keefe

Milagros Cruz,The Daily Meal