BUSINESS

3 Things That Are Keeping Women From Reaching Top Management Positions

When it comes to women achieving real, meaningful success in the workplace, much of the popular advice given over the past couple of years revolves around the role women play in determining their career. Books like Sheryl Sandberg's Lean In focus on the various tactics and strategies professional women can use to claim the jobs they aspire to in senior management positions, also known as the C-suite. But a new report reveals that the responsibility falls on their managers, too.

In the latest white paper from management consulting firm Bain & Co., Everyday Moments Of Truth: Frontline Managers Are Key To Women's Career Aspirations, co-authors Julie Coffman and Bill Neuenfeldt explored why, despite the high number of women who earn an advanced degree and succeed in entry and midlevel positions, there are still too few thriving at the top. The study looked at women in corporate settings across a variety of industries.

"One of the biggest revelations of the research was that women and men will come into the workplace with equivalent levels of aspiration -- in our experience, women come in with higher levels of aspiration to get to top management -- but then we see a big drop-off with the more experienced women in their organizations who have been there longer," Coffman told The Huffington Post. "Somehow, they are less certain that they actually have an interest in going for those top spots, whereas for men, that doubt doesn’t seem to creep in."

Many might expect this change to coincide with a woman's desire or decision to start a family, but the sample in the study showed no discernible difference in the responses from women with and without kids who were both new and experienced employees. Instead, the report exposed three elements in particular that affect a women's career success and, it turns out, have less to do with them specifically and more to do with their surrounding environment.

Here are three workplace factors that keep women from aspiring to top jobs, according to the report.

1. The conventional profile of the successful leader doesn’t look that appealing.

job description

Many of the women did not find the values and ideals encouraged within their company for promotions to be particularly inspirational.

"This idea that you have to always be 'on' or take the highest profile client or be a very adept networker -- which may or may not be written down as promotion criteria but yet are the perceived important things to accomplish in order to get ahead -- were less motivating to the women," said Coffman, who has also served as the chair of Bain's Global Women's Leadership Council for the past five years. "They didn’t feel like they could be that person, that the profile of the successful person was perhaps too limited."

2. They lack an active, supportive relationship with their supervisors.

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Participants who could positively answer the question, "Do you feel like you have a supportive supervisor who is interested in helping you develop you career?" maintained higher levels of remaining aspiration to reach the senior level than those who answered negatively.

The presence of a supervisor who is actively trying to help employees further their careers has a substantial effect on employees' level of interest in progress -- especially with women. Men want supervisor support as well, but the absence of it doesn't seem to affect them as much. Having that built-in support system not only provides a morale boost for employees but helps them produce higher quality work that can, in turn, advance their careers.

3. They don't see a relatable role model within their company.

woman look up

"Do they look up and see that their leadership or feedback style is being personified by the leaders of the company?" Coffman asked. "Do they feel like they see anybody in senior leadership that they would view as a role model?"

Often, because women typically don't see other women in the leadership position they are striving for, it becomes difficult for them to picture moving into such a role themselves. This lack of a role model makes it even more difficult to develop the one-on-one relationship with a boss that can help make them feel comfortable with the idea of aiming high and supported in their attempt to do so.

"A lot of women, in my personal opinion, are looking for the nonexistent," said Coffman regarding finding a role model. "There are very few women in senior leadership roles, and if you think the only role model that is out there for you is a senior woman who’s got your same family situation or is from your same hometown or attended your same university, at some point, it’s like trying to find a needle in a haystack. Instead of an über-role model, think about assembling a personal board of directors -- a collective of individuals that have competencies in different areas that are meaningful to you, and together, embody the various things you’re looking for."

The report comments at length about how women, as they look to progress from middle to senior management, suddenly lose a necessary sense of confidence and replace it with self-doubt. But more significant than that is the dramatic disappearance of their aspirations. Rejuvenating that spirit is not just the work of the women themselves, it's the job of their managers, too.

HuffPost

BEFORE YOU GO

  • 1 Arianna Huffington, 64
    Our very own editor-in-chief is someone we can all draw inspiration from. The media mogul has a number of reasons to celebrat
    Evan Agostini/Invision/AP
    Our very own editor-in-chief is someone we can all draw inspiration from. The media mogul has a number of reasons to celebrate 2014 and look forward to 2015. In May, The Huffington Post will celebrate its 10-year anniversary. Over the past decade, The Huffington Post has won a Pulitzer Prize and has become one of the most popular news sites on the web. This year, Huffington's book "Thrive" also was published and focused on the importance of well-being. The book was on The New York Times bestseller list. And another accomplishment we're all very proud of, The Huffington Post welcomed several international editions this past year, including one in Huffington's native Greece.
  • 2 Diana Nyad, 65
    If you want to talk about being fearless, talk about Diana Nyad. The athlete first tried to swim from Florida to Cuba at age
    Slaven Vlasic via Getty Images
    If you want to talk about being fearless, talk about Diana Nyad. The athlete first tried to swim from Florida to Cuba at age 28, but wasn't able to complete the swim. In 2011, in her 60s, Nyad decided to pursue the dream once again. After five failed attempts, she finally became the first person to make the swim, without the protection of a shark cage, in 2013.

    But that wasn't the last we'd see of Nyad. The 65-year-old proved that she's as talented on land as she is in sea, when her next challenge was a stint on Dancing With The Stars. Though her appearance was short lived, we have a feeling Nyad will someone we'll be hearing about for years to come.

    Isn't life about determining your own finish line? This journey has always been about reaching your own other shore no matter what it is, and that dream continues,"
  • 3 Dame Helen Mirren, 69
    Just shy of 70, the British actress has already made a name for herself with films like "Calendar Girls" and a turn as Her Ma
    Joel Ryan/Invision/AP
    Just shy of 70, the British actress has already made a name for herself with films like "Calendar Girls" and a turn as Her Majesty in "The Queen," which even landed her an Oscar.

    We've always admired her natural beauty and her attitude towards aging (did we mention, that amazing gray hair?). And just earlier this year, cosmetics giant L'Oreal Paris took note too. Mirren was named the company's spokesperson, joining the ranks of much younger actresses like Eva Longoria and Blake Lively.

    So thank you, Dame Helen, for showing us what true beauty really looks like.

    The weird thing is, you get more comfortable in yourself, even as time is giving you less reason for it. When you’re young and beautiful, you’re paranoid and miserable. And then you’re older and it’s ironic.
  • 4 Jamila Bayaz, 50
    A mother-of-five isn't who you'd imagine as law enforcement in Afghanistan. Earlier this year, Bayaz became the first woman t
    ASSOCIATED PRESS
    A mother-of-five isn't who you'd imagine as law enforcement in Afghanistan. Earlier this year, Bayaz became the first woman to be put in charge of security in one of Kabul's districts. The role is symbolic, as formerly under Taliban rule, there were strict restrictions on women working.

    Bayaz is a beacon of hope for other women, who are slowly entering the workforce in the country. She believes that more women in the police force will mean increased security for women and also encourage education.

    This is a chance not just for me, but for the women of Afghanistan. I will not waste it. I will prove that we can handle this burden. I am ready to serve, I am not scared nor am I afraid.
  • 5 Michelle Obama, 50
    FLOTUS, who just turned 50 earlier this year, has been a particularly active First Lady, pioneering the <a href="http://www.w
    ASSOCIATED PRESS
    FLOTUS, who just turned 50 earlier this year, has been a particularly active First Lady, pioneering the "Let's Move!" campaign, encouraging healthier eating and increased fitness, among children, to prevent obesity. And she practices what she preaches.

    At 50, Obama has said she practices yoga and also reportedly does weight training, setting an example for us all.

    Earlier this year, she launched a program called "Reach Higher" challenging all high school students to not only graduate, but to go on to community or four-year colleges. We couldn't think of a better role model.

    Women in particular need to keep an eye on their physical and mental health, because if we're scurrying to and from appointments and errands, we don't have a lot of time to take care of ourselves. We need to do a better job of putting ourselves higher on our own 'to do' list.
  • 6 Christie Brinkley, 60
    We're both in awe of and inspired by Ms. Brinkley. The supermodel who graced magazine covers of Sports Illustrated and the li
    Dan Steinberg/Invision/AP
    We're both in awe of and inspired by Ms. Brinkley. The supermodel who graced magazine covers of Sports Illustrated and the like decades ago turned 60 this year, celebrating age and everything good that comes with it. Brinkley appeared in a swimsuit on the cover of People Magazine in February, proving for once and for all, that age is just a number.

    Brinkley credits yoga, a healthy diet and at least 10 minutes of strength training daily for her fit figure.

    No matter what your age is, you only have now. So it's always about living in the moment and being in the moment...I refuse to let those numbers define me and I just try to face each day positively.