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3 Very Good Reasons to Procrastinate This Summer

Summer time is a perfect time to attack those long-awaited projects, right? Well, we thought we wanted to do them but realize we need a break. Is there ever a time to say procrastination is not such a bad thing? Read on to find out.
07/05/2015 01:21pm ET | Updated July 5, 2016
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Summer time is a perfect time to attack those long-awaited projects, right? Well, we thought we wanted to do them but realize we need a break. It's summer. Can't we just rest? Oh no, suddenly, we don't want to start them. We feel we should, but, well, maybe after the weekend. Is there ever a time to say procrastination is not such a bad thing? Read on to find out.

1. Declare Some Guilt Free Time Off: If you are planning to have some time off this summer, should you really spend each moment reminding yourself over and over again that you need to finish repotting that plant, replacing the bathroom door, or writing the thank you notes? If you know you are a procrastinator, then why bother with the punishment too? You can actually make the choice to procrastinate and dump the guilt! Showering yourself with constant finger pointing and guilt about not doing the project will not allow you to enjoy the time off you do have - which then creates resentment toward the project each day. Instead, pull out your calendar and make a real appointment to complete the project - pick the exact day and time . If you can truly allow yourself to set (and keep) a time to do the project - you can enjoy your time off without the guilt of the project hanging over you.

2. Enjoy a "To Don't List:" One of the top two reasons why people want to get organized is due to extreme overwhelm. They suffer from the "O'Factor:" Overtired, overworked, overspending, overweight, overcommitted......sound familiar? That means we are doing too much -- and adding more to our "to do" lists only exacerbates the problem. How can you combat this dilemma? Consider taking your current "to do" list and eliminate items from the list that you really do NOT need to do. It's possible to eliminate the procrastination by saying good-bye to the "not-so-necessary" items on your list. Not everything is important or urgent and you can allow yourself to experience time off without worries of procrastination. Pick only the projects that need to be done and try to remove the non-essential items. Your family will thank you and your overburdened mind will thank you.

3. Procrastination While You Play: If you know you are a procrastinator, then why not work with what you know about yourself rather than try to fight it? If you have to get your passport and you've been stalling, try a little "planned procrastination " while you play. Grab a piece of paper or your tablet, and every time you have another thought about that passport project, simply jot down one thing you can do to get the project complete. Here are some examples: if you are watching a movie and a commercial floats by about a dream trip to Hawaii, take the hint for your passport project and write down: "get address of passport office"....or, when combing your hair in the morning and you realize you need a haircut for your passport photo - grab your iPad and type in "get haircut" under your passport project....or, If you are paying bills and know you need a check for the passport office, make a note to "write a check for passport office" and keep the note with your other notes for the passport project. By the time you actually get to the project, you will have a plan in place - simply review your list of notes, prioritize them, and calendar them. All the steps have a home on your schedule and your trip around the world will soon become a reality.

Now, to make the shift to stop procrastinating for real, you need to understand the different factors that influence your feelings: psychological factors, time management issues and lack of self-care. Try these tips to make the shift:

Pinpoint the fear.
What is preventing you from doing what you need to do? Is pain stopping you from going to the dentist? Are you afraid of failure? There are so many fears out there; and the trick is to determine what is holding you back and work to overcome it.

Stop Trying To Be So Perfect.
Avoid perfection at all costs. "Satisfize" don't optimize. You can refine it later. If you wait for all circumstances to be in order, you will never begin the task.

Use "Off Time" As an Ally
Ten Minutes while waiting for a friend or a ride can be used to jot notes about a paper or sketch a plan for a project. Don't expect to get it all done in one sitting.

Envision Completion.
Imagine what you will be able to do with your time when you don't have to work on the project. Imagine your feeling of accomplishment and joy at completing the task.