CRIME

Police Ask That You Not Call 911 For TV Listings

This image provided by Cox Communications shows a program guide for television set-top boxes to make it easier to find progra
This image provided by Cox Communications shows a program guide for television set-top boxes to make it easier to find programs available live or on demand. Itᅢテᅡᆳs an important development for cable TV companies, as they face criticisms for providing hundreds of channels that customers donᅢテᅡᆳt watch. Making shows easier to find helps the companies justify all those channels. (AP Photo/Cox Communications)

If you want to know what's on TV tonight, there are plenty of places to look. You can even search the channel listings right here at HuffPost TV.

But whatever you do, don't call 911.

A dispatcher at the Norwood, Mass., police department said an elderly person, who was hard of hearing, called the emergency line on Tuesday to find out what was on TV. And while the incident might be a little amusing, the authorities in Norwood want to make sure the message gets out: 911 is for emergencies.

Finding out what's on TV isn't an emergency.

HuffPost

BEFORE YOU GO

  • 10 “My son won’t give me the remote control.”
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  • 9 “Can an officer come over to tell my kids to go to bed?”
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  • 8 911 caller asks how to dial up the operator.
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  • 7 911 caller asks for morning wake-up call.
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  • 6 “I threw my phone into the garbage can and can't get it out.”
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  • 5 911 caller asks for help to activate voicemail on his mobile phone.
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  • 4 911 caller asks to drive in the HOV lane.
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  • 3 911 caller reports a missed newspaper delivery.
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  • 2 911 caller asked for date’s contact information so they could make plans.
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  • 1 “I'd like to speak to someone about renting a fire truck to block off a street for a party."