How Abercrombie & Fitch Brought American Muslims And Jews Together

FILE - In this Thursday, Dec. 4, 2008, file photo, a shopper hurries past the Abercrombie & Fitch store at Beachwood Place Mall in Beachwood, Ohio. Drops in sales and weak profit forecasts are quite a change for the retailers that gained popularity in the last decade among teens that coveted their logo tees and trendy jeans that became a high school uniform of sorts. But these stores have been losing favor with their core demographic since the recession. (AP Photo/Amy Sancetta, File)
FILE - In this Thursday, Dec. 4, 2008, file photo, a shopper hurries past the Abercrombie & Fitch store at Beachwood Place Mall in Beachwood, Ohio. Drops in sales and weak profit forecasts are quite a change for the retailers that gained popularity in the last decade among teens that coveted their logo tees and trendy jeans that became a high school uniform of sorts. But these stores have been losing favor with their core demographic since the recession. (AP Photo/Amy Sancetta, File)

Say what you want about Abercrombie & Fitch (A&F), the chain has done something special. No, I’m not talking some dazzling new clothing line for ultra hip young people. Something far better.

A&F has brought American Muslims and Jews together. Of course, the bad news for A&F is that they have united some in these two communities against them.

Last week seven orthodox Jewish groups joined with the Muslim civil rights group CAIR in filing briefs with the Supreme Court in support a lawsuit filed on behalf of Samantha Elauf against A&F. Elauf, who is Muslim, had applied for a job at an A&F store in Tulsa, Oklahoma when she was 17. The assistant manager at the A&F store had found Elauf qualified for the position and was apparently going to hire her.

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