POLITICS

'Aiding The Enemy' Charge Not Dismissed By Judge In Bradley Manning Trial

FORT MEADE, MD - JUNE 06:  U.S. Army Private Bradley Manning is escorted as he leaves a military court at the end of the firs
FORT MEADE, MD - JUNE 06: U.S. Army Private Bradley Manning is escorted as he leaves a military court at the end of the first of a three-day motion hearing June 6, 2012 in Fort Meade, Maryland. Manning, an Army intelligence analyst who has been accused of passing thousands of diplomatic cables and intelligence reports to the whistleblowing website WikiLeaks and facing 22 charges including aiding the enemy, returned to the court room to ask for dismissal of 10 of the charges. (Photo by Alex Wong/Getty Images)

By DAVID DISHNEAU, THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

FORT MEADE, Md. — A military judge is refusing to dismiss a charge that an Army private aided the enemy by giving reams of classified information to the anti-secrecy website WikiLeaks.

Col. Denise Lind ruled Thursday on the defense motion in the court-martial of Pfc. Bradley Manning at Fort Meade, near Baltimore.

It is the most serious charge Manning faces, punishable by up to life in prison without parole. Lind found there was enough prosecution evidence to proceed with the case.

Lind also refused to dismiss a computer fraud count.

Lind is still considering defense motions to acquit Manning of five theft counts.

Manning has pleaded guilty to reduced versions of some charges. He faces up to 20 years in prison for those offenses.

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