RELIGION

American Quakers Create 'Underground Railroad' For Ugandans Fleeing Anti-Gay Laws

Anti-homosexuality activists march through the streets of Ugandan capital, Kampala on March 31, 2014 in support of the govern
Anti-homosexuality activists march through the streets of Ugandan capital, Kampala on March 31, 2014 in support of the government's stance against homosexuality. The march dubbed : The 2014 parade and thanksgiving celebrating the Anti-Homosexuality bill saw many Ugandas join vocal Pastor Martin Sempa during the walk to show solidarity with President Yoweri Museveni and other activists at the Kololo airstrip. Last month, Ugandan President Yoweri Museveni signed a bill that calls for 'repeat homosexuals' to be jailed for life, outlaws any promotion of homosexuality and requires people to report homosexuals. The European parliament responded by backing sanctions against Uganda, saying the country had violated human rights and democratic principles. AFP PHOTO/ ISAAC KASAMANI (Photo credit should read ISAAC KASAMANI/AFP/Getty Images)

A group of American Quakers say they are offering a way out for some desperate Ugandans fleeing the country’s new Anti-Homosexuality Act.

This group, based in Olympia, Wash., calls its project the Friends New Underground Railroad (FNUR) because it sees itself as following in the footsteps of the Quakers who helped bring slaves out of the American South before the Civil War. Working with fewer than 10 Ugandan “conductors,” they report having funded passage out of the country for 107 people with grants ranging from $52-$185. The refugees mostly travel in small groups on back roads and make their way to safe houses in neighboring countries.

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