CRIME

Amtrak Engineer Was Not Using Cell Phone During Philadelphia Crash: NTSB Report

Workers labor on the site where a deadly train derailment occurred earlier in the week, Friday, May 15, 2015, in Philadelphia
Workers labor on the site where a deadly train derailment occurred earlier in the week, Friday, May 15, 2015, in Philadelphia. Amtrak is working to restore Northeast Corridor rail service between New York City and Philadelphia. Service was suspended after a train derailed in Philadelphia on Tuesday night, killing eight passengers and injuring more than 200. (AP Photo/Julio Cortez)

The engineer of the Amtrak train that derailed in Philadelphia on May 12 was not using his cell phone at the time of the accident, according to a National Transportation Safety Board report released Wednesday.

Officials conducted a detailed investigation of Brandon Bostian's cell phone records, including calls, texts and data usage during the time he was operating the train. The investigation also found that Bostian did not access the train’s Wi-Fi system, according to the report.

An earlier NTSB report confirmed that Amtrak Train 188 clocked in at 106 mph over the Frankford Junction curve, where the speed limit is only 50 mph. Bostian activated the train’s emergency brakes seconds before the train derailed.

The accident killed eight people and sent more than 200 to hospitals.

A lawyer for Bostian said earlier this month that the engineer has no memory of the crash.

"He remembers coming into the curve, he remembers attempting to reduce speed, but thereafter he was knocked out just like all the other passengers on the train," attorney Robert Goggin said on ABC’s “Good Morning America.”

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