Ballot Fiasco Raises Questions About Keyser's Competency

In its report on a Denver judge's decision to allow U.S. Senate candidate Jon Keyser on the Republican primary ballot, after the Secretary of State had rejected his petitions, The Denver Post's John Frank and Mark Matthews reported:

Once considered a favorite in the race, Keyser must now overcome other challenges that are injecting questions into this campaign -- not least among them, the fact he needed a court ruling to keep his campaign alive. [BigMedia emphasis]

It's unclear just how much of a liability Keyser's signature-gathering fiasco will be, but the reporters were correct to write that it raises questions--as yet unexplored in detail by journalists--about whether Keyser's short stint on the campaign trail and in public service has shown him to be competent not only to run a campaign but to be an effective U.S. Senator, to replace Democrat Michael Bennet.

Keyser's Republican colleague in the Colorado State House, Rep. Justin Everett of Littleton, jumped on Facebook last week to write that Keyser "isn't ready for prime time," as evidenced by Keyer's fundraing troubles and other bungles.

Everett: Not to say he won't cure, suers gonna sue. But what's interesting here is how close he was in Congressional District 1 (20 signatures), in heavily Republican CD5 (a mere 76 signatures), and CD 6 (75 signatures). If another candidate were to contest the validity of those Congressional Districts, he may be deemed insufficient in other areas. Not to mention his announcement claim that he had $3 million pledged to his campaign but only raised $200K, while contributing $100K of his own money. After serving with him for a mere year in the legislature, it is still pretty clear he isn't ready for prime time...

Everett was a serious backer of one of Keyser's opponents, State. Sen. Tim Neville, also of Littleton, who was rejected by Republicans last week.

Still, in saying,"After serving with [Keyser] for a mere year in the legislature, it is still pretty clear he isn't ready for prime time," Everett is leveling a serious accusation.

If you couple that statement with Keyser's other campaign lapses, you have a bunch of unanswered questions about Keyser's basic competency that need to be addressed by reporters as the campiagn gears up.