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Becoming

I love teenagers. I do. Everything about them: the awkward, the self-conscious, even the angry bits. I'm especially intrigued by the way they shed their childhood like a skin and emerge a newer, older version of themselves.
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I love teenagers. I do. Everything about them: the awkward, the self-conscious, even the angry bits. I'm especially intrigued by the way they shed their childhood like a skin and emerge a newer, older version of themselves. I even kind of love parenting teenagers. I know--it sounds nuts, but I feel I hit my stride as a mom when my kids hit double digits.

My babies slathered me with sloppy, open-mouthed kisses and clung to me like monkeys with their dimpled fingers; their miniature selves extensions of my body, not quite separate. Pressing them, sweet smelling and downy to my chest, was intoxicating. It comforted me as much as them. But there was the sleep-deprivation and the crying and the poop. So much poop. Not my fave.

My toddlers left sticky handprints on the walls, dropping crumbs in their wake and careening clumsily through our days, insisting loudly, "No, I do it!" Mini-tyrants, they asserted their independence and in conquering their world, dominated mine. Adorable to grandmotherly types who no longer dealt with blow out tantrums and whole gallons of spilt milk. Pass.

My preschoolers asked thousands of questions starting with "Why . . . ?" Insatiably curious, they chased sensory input with the sole purpose of soaking up knowledge . . . and destroying my house. Their constant motion and boundless energy siphoned me dry. Plus, the requisite mommy activities filled me with dread: crafts was code for a special sort of hell surrounded by scissors, glue, and a million tiny beads. Not my best skill set.

In elementary school, baby-fat gave way to long legs as my kids morphed into capable young people with new skills and talents. They lived large and played hard and the noise threshold hovered around ear shattering, leaving me slightly deaf and functionally catatonic. No thanks.

By pre-pubescence, mysterious internal stirrings accompanied outward signs of impending change. On the cusp of a developmental leap, my children remained child-ish, but their sense of savvy and street smarts emerged. Thinking for themselves and testing limits, their personalities started taking shape and I enjoyed their unique brand of humor and conversation. All in all, a delightful stage, except for the hygiene: showers, toothpaste and clean underwear -- not even on their radar.

With full-on adolescence, things got much more complicated; the physical work of parenting shifted dramatically to mental stress and strain. I expected the hormonal mood swings, the acne, the shocking growth spurts and voice changes, but I did not foresee that while their bodies mimicked adulthood and their psyches masked a false bravado, their brains -- and hearts -- remained immature and thus vulnerable. They were babies in grownup bodies. What I wanted most was to keep them talking; I believed that communication is key to navigating the rough waters of parent-teen relationships and in my book, we succeeded. They felt safe enough to come to me with anything. Well, 'aaaal-most anything,' according to my husband.

Don't get me wrong, it was no nirvana, and I will state for the record, sometimes it was God-awful. I was certain we'd be swept under by those rapids, but we made it. And over the years, the intensity has faded -- ironically, not unlike labor pains -- and what lingers are gratifying memories of my older children becoming the smart, funny, compassionate and talented individuals they are today. Lucky for us: two down, two to go.

Now Sydney, 15, traverses the current. At schedule pick-up walking the halls of the high school, crowded with teenagers a full head taller than my petite daughter, I follow behind, watching her stride confidently down the corridor. I feel an acute sense of poignancy so sharp it's almost painful: my girl, who happens to have Down syndrome, is a freshman.

While it's true that many people with intellectual disabilities will retain child-like qualities, they do mature mentally, physically and emotionally. Sydney initially resisted the changes to her body. "I don't want to become a woman!" she cried. But with the onset of her cycle, she's embracing her new place among the women in our family and wants to share the news. With her trademark lack of self-consciousness and social decorum, she makes random comments -- in public, no less. "I'm wearing a new bra!" and "Me and Mom are growing boobs. We're boob twins."

Sydney is intuitively aware of her disability and how she fits into social manueverings. As a cheerleader, she has an opportunity to 'belong,' but her success depends on me going to practice with her. I learn the routines and then teach them to her; practicing over and over and over. I've not always been cheer-ful about doing it. More than once I thought it was too much, for both of us. However, I also know she's competent -- she can do it, I've seen her! Despite the sighing and the tears, it's worth it to see her achieve, on her own merit. Besides, she looks darling in her uniform.

Raising kids requires discernment about when to protect and when to prod, when to hold back and when to let go. With special needs kids, it's easy to err on the side of caution and unintentionally block their progress. Sometimes we just need to get out of the way.

Like hatchling chicks, adolescents gain strength by breaking through their shells, earning a resilience they'll need to live on their own. In many ways Sydney is a normal 15-year-old who loves YouTube and shopping and Taylor Swift and pizza parties. A teenager who rolls her eyes and says, "Mom, you're 'bare-assing me!" Who wants a phone and her own room. And a boyfriend.

Being a mom to teenagers is the ultimate exercise in frustration, but I kinda love it. Two down, and of the two that are left, one has begun the trek to independence and the other -- our last -- is not far behind.

A few nights ago, Haley, age 11, came out of her room sobbing, during the sacred time between the girls' bedtime and our own. From my seat on the couch I watched her make a beeline to my husband, Steven, who stood in the kitchen. She wrapped her arms around his waist and buried her face in his belly.

"What's the matter, love?" Daddy asked. "Did you have a bad dream?"

She cried and mumbled something incoherently.

"Sweetie, I can't understand you," he said, bending over and untangling her from his torso.

Pulling her head back and wiping her nose on his shirt, she took a deep breath and wailed, "I'm crying but I don't ... know ... why!" and collapsed into fresh sobs.

He had the good sense to rub her back sympathetically, but looked to me helplessly, raising his eyebrows. He shrugged his shoulders as if to say, "Um, this? It's all yours."

"Come here," I said soothingly and stretched my arm out. She settled into my lap, curling into my body as I stroked her hair. "Chickadee, I know exactly how you feel."

Some things, we don't grow out of.