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Ben Whishaw: 'Most People Are On A Spectrum' Of Sexuality

In a new interview, the "Mary Poppins Returns" star said he sought therapy to come to terms with identifying as gay.

Ben Whishaw opened up about his path to living authentically in a new interview, revealing that he avoided speaking about his sexuality publicly for years out of concerns he’d be pigeonholed as an actor. 

The British-born star of “Mary Poppins Returns” told The Sunday Times Magazine he once “hated” himself for identifying as gay, eventually seeking out therapy to work through his struggles.  

“There was a moment in my early 20s when I did not feel very good about myself,” Whishaw said in the interview, published March 24. “It was to do with my sexuality and not knowing how to be myself and hating myself. I did know [my sexuality], I just couldn’t tell anyone.”

Therapy, the Golden Globe winner said, “really helped him,” and he entered into a civil partnership with Australian composer Mark Bradshaw in 2012. He came out publicly as gay the following year.  

He also told The Sunday Times Magazine that he believes sexuality exists on a varying scale for every person. 

“I think it’s very unfair when people say they’re bisexual, and they’re accused of being gay really,” he said. “If we’re honest about these things, perhaps most people are on a spectrum.” 

Coming out, he said, has had little impact on his stage and screen career thus far. 

“People assume there’s some juicy secret,” he noted. “I don’t think [sexuality] is the be-all and end-all, and since revealing my sexuality I haven’t had any negative effects.” 

These days, Whishaw is busier than ever after winning a Golden Globe for “A Very English Scandal” in January. 

Later this year, he’ll be seen opposite Dev Patel in “The Personal History of David Copperfield,” and is slated to begin shooting the next, as-yet-untitled James Bond film with Daniel Craig and Ralph Fiennes. 

He’s set to return to the stage this spring, too, in “Norma Jeane Baker of Troy,” opening April 6 in New York.  

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