Best Reporting on the State Legislature in 2016

Here's my list of the best reporting on the Colorado state legislature this session, from a progressive perspective. The press corps is threatened and depleted but continues to crank out quality journalism. Let's hope we can say that next year.

o In a detailed analysis of votes on numerous issues, The Denver Post's John Frank illuminated beautifully that the split among GOP state senators reflects divisions in the Republican Party nationally. His list of eight hard-right state senators, later dubbed the "Hateful Eight" by liberals, includes two in possible swing districts: Randy Baumgardner of Hot Sulphur Springs and Laura Woods of Westminster.

o The Denver Post's John Frank broke a story exposing the tactics of Americans for Prosperity in pressuring state lawmakers to sign a pledge not to "undermine the Taxpayer's Bill of Rights by creating a special exemption for the Hospital Provider Fee." The Colorado Independent's Corey Hutchins filled out the picture of AFP with an illuminating piece about the organization's field work--as well as another story featuring the angry response of Republican Sen. Larry Crowder (R-Alamosa) to AFP's apparent pressure on Crowder. The pressure from AFP appeared to have ratcheted up after Hutchins had matter-of-factly reported Crowder's views in support of turning the provider fee into an enterprise.

o The Colorado Independent's Corey Hutchins also banged out an excellent explainer of the hospital provider fee (and related issues), just as the legislative session was cranking up and few people understood what the fee was and what was going on.

o Rocky Mountain Community Radio's Bente Birkeland offers a daily drumbeat of short interviews that often prove illuminating or provide a springboard more in-depth analysis (e.g., Secretary of State Wayne Williams' position on election modernization or Sen. Larry Crowder's stance on Syrian refugees).

o The Durango Herald's Peter Marcus asked why J. Paul Brown (R-Ignacio) had voted last year for a program offering contraception to low-income women and teens, but this year voted against it.  It's basic journalism, of course, but often forgotten in onslaught of other news.

o The Colorado Independent's Marrianne Goodland provided in-depth coverage on, among other legislation, a predatory-lending bill that was defeated by state house Democrats.

o Fox 31 Denver's Amanda Zitzman put a human face on a bill aimed at informing citizens about the cost of free-standing emergency rooms versus urgent care.

o The Denver Post's Joey Bunch is trying to do something different at the newspaper with his "Joey 'Splains" series. He's on the right track.

o On the legislative campaign trail, we owe thanks to the reporters who covered the caucuses and county assemblies, allowing us not to rely solely on reports by party activists. The Colorado Statesman's coverage, especially Ernest Luning's, on social media and in articles stands out.

o The Boulder Weekly's Caitlin Rockett found holes in the assertion that a bill targeting tax havens was bad for small business.

o The Colorado Statesman's Hot Sheet is a welcome infusion of legislative news. (In the advocacy world, ProgressNow Colorado's Daily News Digest is a userful compilation of political news coverage.)

o The Colorado Independent's Marianne Goodland was the only journalist to write about the crazy irony of Rep. Kevin Priola missing a vote on a parental-leave bill, which he opposed, because he had to take his kid to the doctor.