RELIGION

Your Next Bible Will Be A Hologram

In this Jan. 21, 2015 photo, Microsoft's Lorraine Bardeen demonstrates HoloLens headset during an event at the company's head
In this Jan. 21, 2015 photo, Microsoft's Lorraine Bardeen demonstrates HoloLens headset during an event at the company's headquarters in Redmond, Wash. With the new HoloLens headset, Microsoft is offering real-world examples to show how you might use three-dimensional digital images _ or holograms _ in daily life. (AP Photo/Elaine Thompson)

Microsoft this week unveiled HoloLens, an augmented-reality headset that overlays text and images on the real world and, in particular, anchors them to precise locations in space, as if they were real objects.

At this year’s BibleTech conference, I’m going to discuss why the idea of the “digital library” doesn’t appeal to certain kinds of people, and one aspect of the discussion involves the tension between print books and digital ones, each of which has advantages and disadvantages. Microsoft’s holographic technology (I recognize that one, they’re not really holograms, and two, what I’m describing here may go beyond what’s possible in the first devices) presents an intriguing way to bridge the physical and digital worlds of Bible study.

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