IMPACT

Struggling Blind Musician Gives Away Money He Collects To People In Need

"I'm going to keep giving until I can't give any more."

Eddie Maltsby Jr. can’t see, but his vision for his life’s plan is crystal clear.

According to his GoFundMe page, Maltsby became blind when he was 11 due to sarcoidosis, a rare condition that affects multiple organs. Despite his prognosis, Maltsby has committed to bringing light to people in need by playing music on the streets of St. Petersburg, Florida, and donating what he can to them, WTSP reported. 

"I'm going to keep giving until I can't give any more," he told the news outlet. "I mean, right now I'm giving where I can't give anymore so why stop?"

In addition to playing for the public, Maltsby also hosts a radio show on WRXB called, “Blind Boy Radio.”

While on the air, the generous musician gives away groceries, cash and other goods to grateful callers.

To date, Maltsby has donated $2,000, but his funds are running low –- even with help from sponsors.

That’s why he’s turning to the community for help.

Maltsby has set up a GoFundMe campaign with the hope of collecting $25,000 to aid struggling people in the community. 

According to the most recent point-in-time count, there were 3,391 people on the streets of Pinellas County on a single night last year. 

While Maltsby's benevolent spirit is heartening, it’s often the people with little to spare who demonstrate how easy it is to part with money. 

Last year, for example, YouTube prankster Magic of Rahat rigged a "lotto" game so that a homeless man would win $1,000. The first thing the homeless man did was offer to share his winnings with Rahat who had given him the ticket. 

And this past winter, when Dominique Harrison-Bentzen, a British student, was stranded and didn’t have any way to get home, a homeless man gave her all the money he had -- $4.60 -- for a taxi. 

She returned the favor by setting up a fundraiser for the kind man, which has since collected more than 32,000 British pounds (over $50,000). 

"I hope my campaign will help people think a little more about the people around them,” Harrison-Bentzen told the Mirror. “"If people can see what I am doing then maybe they can take the time to just stop and talk to a homeless person, hear their story.” 

Learn more about Eddie Maltsby Jr. and his fundraising efforts here. 

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