Brazil's Internet Constitution

FILE - In this March 23, 2010 file photo, a surveillance camera is seen in front of the Google China headquarters in Beijing,
FILE - In this March 23, 2010 file photo, a surveillance camera is seen in front of the Google China headquarters in Beijing, China. Google Inc. said one of its Web search features was blocked in China on Thursday, July 1, 2010 as the company awaited Beijing's decision on whether to renew its operating license in their latest skirmish over censorship. (AP Photo/Andy Wong, File)

From Project Syndicate

SAO PAULO -- Brazil's House of Representatives has passed a genuine Internet "Bill of Rights," which was unanimously approved by the senate and signed into law by President Dilma Rousseff last week -- much to the delight of civil-society advocates.

The legislation, widely described as an Internet constitution, seeks to safeguard online freedom of expression and limit government collection and usage of Internet users' metadata. The bill ensures "net neutrality" (meaning that Internet service providers must treat all information and users equally), and subjects global companies, such as Google and Facebook, to Brazilian law and precedent in cases involving its own citizens.