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Chrissy Teigen On Value Of Sharing The 'Bad Guy' Parenting Role With John Legend

"You just have to be on the same page all the time because it’s not fair when there’s one bad person [or] a bad guy,” the "Cravings" author said.

Chrissy Teigen recently opened up about the importance of sharing the so-called “bad guy” parenting role with her husband, singer John Legend, during an interview with People. 

The model and cookbook author, who was recently named one of Time’s 100 most influential people of 2019, told the publication that sometimes their daughter Luna, 3, tries to “get away with things” by approaching different family members for certain things. 

“You just have to be on the same page all the time because it’s not fair when there’s one bad person [or] a bad guy,” she said. “No one wants to be the bad guy, so it’s helpful when you’re all the bad guy. It’s important to be on the same page.”

Teigen noted that Luna will also at times approach either parent or Teigen’s mother Vilailuck, also known as Yai, to seek different outcomes for particular requests.

“I’m like, ‘No, we’re all in this together. Sorry, we’re on the same page. If Yai says you need to apologize for this, I’m gonna say the same thing,’” she added. 

Legend and Teigen, who also have a 11-month-old son named Miles, apparently have slightly different parenting styles when it comes leniency, the “Lip Sync Battle” co-host said. 

She told People that Legend is “easier” when it comes to “meaningless stuff,” like Luna eating string cheese 20 minutes before dinner. 

But Teigen’s comments about the importance of sharing the “bad guy” role with Legend overall, helps to combat “fun” dad stereotypes often associated with opposite-sex couples. 

Prior to Luna’s birth, Legend shared with Entertainment Tonight in 2016 how he planned to raise either a son or a daughter.

“I’m not one of those people that’s like ‘well my boy can do anything he wants, and then my girl’s gotta, you know, be in the convent,’” he said, adding that he would just teach his future children to be “good people.” 

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