Colorado Republican Sees Possible End of the GOP

Republican gubernatorial candidate Bob Beauprez, who lost to Gov. John Hickenlooper in 2014, has a message for his fellow Republicans who might be nervous about the future of their party:

Beauprez: "At the end of all this, tough as it's going to be, family squabbles can be pretty messy sometimes. But at the end of it, you realize, we are family. You grab hands. You give everybody a big hug and say, alright, let's go win this thing." (Listen to more on KOA 850-AM clip below.)

Republican senatorial candidate Bob Schaffer, who lost to former Sen. Mark Udall in 2008, has a different take:

Schaffer: "I think it is possible that we may be seeing the final months of the existence of the Republican Party. I really think that's possible. If it's going to salvage itself and restore itself and continue itself, it's got to be something dramatic--and it's not a Trump thing. Trump is not going to rescue it. And neither are the party insiders, who think business as usual is the way to keep doing business." (Listen to more on KCOL clip below.)

Beauprez's thoughts on the Republican crisis were by far the sunneist I've seen in Colorado, where most of the top GOP leaders in the state took the astonishing position of refusing to say whether they'd back Trump if he became the actual factual nominee--even after calling him a "fraud" (Buck) or a "buffoon" (Gardner).

After being asked seven times, Gardner said he'd back Trump if he's nominated. So maybe Beauprez reminded Gardner of his familial obligations?

The story that's missing now is, which elected Republicans, at any level here in Colorado, actually like Trump, not by default but affirmatively.

I've seen only such person so far, and that's State Sen. Laura Woods (here at 25 min 50 sec). Trump is one of her favorite prez candidates. Who else is out there? And why?

Partial transcript of comments byBob Schaffer on KCOL March 3:

Schaffer: This sounds kind of radical, but I've been thinking about this a lot. I think it is possible that we may be seeing the final months of the existence of the Republican Party. I really think that's possible. If it's going to salvage itself and restore itself and continue itself, it's got to be something dramatic--and it's not a Trump thing. Trump is not going to rescue it. And neither are the party insiders who think business as usual is the way to keep doing business. But it's got to be something dramatic and remarkable. It's got come from the grassroots, maybe from the states or some collection of states that re-centers not the philosophy of the Republican Party but the behavior of the Republican Party. That's the only way it's going to be salvaged. If that doesn't happen, somehow quickly and in some remarkable way, I think it's possible by the time we are going into a presidential election again four years from now, we're going to be talking about Democrats and some other party, some other organization. Maybe the Republican Party will be around, but it will be a third party by then. I really think that could be where we're at right now.

Partial transcript of comments by Bob Beauprez on KOA 850-AM March 3.

Beauprez: A lot of us are seeing what used to go on behind those closed doors, behind the curtain.  We're seeing it played out live and in person. This is serious high-stakes politics. Nothing more serious than a presidential nominee. And people feel passionately about it.... At the end of the day, I fully epect, whoever our nominee ends up being, after all the drama has played out, that conservatives will come together and support that nominee because the alternative to us conservatives is so unacceptable...We've been down this road before. Every four years, it seems like we go through this with a nomination process. I remember very well the campaign in 1980, and we all thought, oh my goodness, did you hear what George H. W. Bush said about Ronald Reagan with voodoo economics. And we thought that was appalling. Well, then they come together and are on the same ticket, and they serve very well together and became great friends. Politics is a strange business... But at the end of the day, all these guys want is to do what's right for the country. And they will fight very hard for the right to be that standard bearer. But at the end of the day, we will come together around one. ... At the end of all this, tough as it's going to be, family squabbles can be pretty messy sometimes. But at the end of it, you realize, we are family. You grab hands. You give everybody a big hug and say, alright, let's go win this thing. That's how it will end up, I think.