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Consumed: Junk Food

In HuffPost Food & Drink’s series Consumed, we’ll shine a light on Americans’ obsession with food, one topic at a time. March's theme is junk food.

This March, as we wander further and further from our New Year’s resolutions to eat nothing but salad all year, we explore the mysterious call of junk food. We’ll find out why Oreo keeps releasing those weird new flavors (and how we’re helping to do their marketing for them), explore a cancer-fighting ingredient in Cheez Whiz, rank the healthiest (and least healthy) candy bars, and so much more.

Keep coming back all month as we update with more stories!

Three trusted registered dietitians sift through the ingredients and nutrients important to kids’ diets.
Experts love brands like Caulipower, Amy's and California Pizza Kitchen. Find out why.
It’s easier than you think and a lot healthier than the fast-food version.
Organic food is surrounded by a "health halo" that misleads consumers.
The processed food contains high levels of a fatty acid called CLA, which has been linked to burning fat and fighting cancer. Here's why you should be skeptical.
Three experts scrape to find redeeming qualities in Snickers, Hershey's and other beloved chocolate bars.
The chips are stacked against us when it comes to resisting our favorite foods. Find out why.
You can eat an entire sleeve of Oreos or a bag of Hot Cheetos and still not feel satiated. It's because your body knows things your brain doesn't.
The classic cookie can't be beat, so why does Oreo keep releasing flavors like Watermelon and Carrot Cake?
Three nutritionists explain what to look for when your next snack attack strikes.
These hidden junk food ads are making childhood obesity worse.
Black teens saw more than twice as many television ads for fast food, candy, sugary drinks and unhealthy snacks compared with white teens in 2017, according to a new study.