DETROIT

Detroit Could Get Through Bankruptcy Without New Borrowing, Says Kevyn Orr

Kevyn Orr, emergency manager for the city of Detroit, listens during a news conference in Detroit, Michigan, U.S., on Friday,
Kevyn Orr, emergency manager for the city of Detroit, listens during a news conference in Detroit, Michigan, U.S., on Friday, July 19, 2013. Detroit, the cradle of the automobile assembly line and a symbol of industrial might, filed the biggest U.S. municipal bankruptcy after decades of decline left it too poor to pay billions of dollars owed bondholders, retired cops and current city workers. Photographer: Jeff Kowalsky/Bloomberg via Getty Images

(Corrects day of week to Wednesday, not Tuesday)

DETROIT, Aug 7 (Reuters) - Detroit's state-appointed emergency manager said on Wednesday he is confident the city should be able to navigate its way through the nation's largest-ever municipal bankruptcy before his term expires by October 2014 and possibly without having any new borrowing to fund Detroit's operations.

"If we can get our cash flow free-and-clear, we may be able to get through this thing without necessarily borrowing a lot of money," Kevyn Orr said in a wide-ranging interview on Tuesday. "The schedule we're on, we should be able to get this done in 14 months, so I don't anticipate a need for me to stay on." (Reporting by Nick Carey; Editing by Gary Hill)

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