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Style

These Brave Dads Let Their Kids Dress Them For Work. Here's What Happened.

The results are better than you'd think.

What is "dad style" these days? At The Huffington Post, it's anything from v-neck tees to business suits. For Father's Day, we wanted to give our office dads a makeover, so we went to their kids for advice on how to dress for work.

We turned to Mark Silverstein, HuffPost's head of business development, Victor Brand, our standards editor, and Damon Dahlen, our photo editor (and the photographer for this shoot). Each is father to two children. And though their kids dressed them for work, nobody ended up being dressed like a princess or a clown -- two specific looks they legitimately feared. In fact, everybody walked away from this feeling pretty excited about their kids' future prospects in the fashion industry.

Here are pictures of what each dad usually wears to work, followed by the photo of the outfit chosen by his kids -- judge for yourself, but we're into the kid looks.

BEFORE: Mark Silverstein
KIDS DRESSING FATHERS
AFTER
Damon Dahlen/Huffington Post
Silverstein asked his two kids, Cyrus (age 3) and Chloe (19 months), to collaborate on his Mickey Mouse look. "Chloe confirmed the choices and picked out the shoes and socks. I opened up my closet and she goes, 'shoosh shoosh' and ended up on these. Cyrus picked out the Mickey shirt, because it’s his favorite. He had a couple other ones that he was deciding between and I asked him if it was raining outside and he said no, but he was worried that I would get cold in just a T-shirt so he said you have to wear a long-sleeved shirt under the Mickey Mouse shirt so that everybody can see the Mickey Mouse. He was really excited. I feel pretty good about wearing this on the subway; I feel like I could play softball in this -- like a work-to-play-to-evening wear outfit. I think he could have a career in styling [laughs]."
BEFORE: Victor Brand
Damon Dahlen/Huffington Post
AFTER
Damon Dahlen/Huffington Post
Brand asked his 4-year-old daughter to help on this project because he trusted her attention to detail a little more than his son, who's 7. "It was very spur of the moment," he said, and it took her all of five minutes. "She came to the bedroom, opened the closet. She was very decisive -- shirt first, pants, then hat. The shoes that she picked were under the hat, so she got the hat out (and I have two hats, one that is really ratty and a new one, so she picked the new one). Grabbed a tie, didn’t spend a lot of time looking through, but when we got to the socks it was the only time where she made a few selections. It wasn’t like she was doing it as like, 'Oh, this is fun.' It was sort of like, 'This is a thing daddy asked me to do so I'll do this thing before I go back about my business.' We all complimented her on her choices. It was a good outfit! I was very impressed, I felt much better about where it went. ... My son would have put me in a Star Wars shirt and jeans."Vic's daughter went with a baseball aesthetic, choosing cleats and a tie to match the hat.
BEFORE: Damon Dahlen
James Cave/Huffington Post
AFTER
James Cave/Huffington Post
Dahlen, father of Sebastian and Aly, says he asked 6-year-old Sebastian for this because "I was scared what my daughter would actually have given me -- I would have dressed up like a princess probably. So I kinda hedged my bet a little there. I asked him over the phone, he was kinda like, 'OK...' Really unsure why I was asking, a little suspicious. So my wife took him into the room and pulled out all the drawers and said, 'Pick whatever you want.' But he knows how to dress -- better than me. He’s a very stylish little kid, I don't know where he gets that from but certainly not me. But I felt like I looked good! I’d have him pick out my outfits again if he’d do it. Normally every morning I have my wife check me out to make sure there’s nothing out of whack, but maybe I should have that be his job. He’s better at it than I am."