David Meister, Commodity Futures Trading Commission Enforcement Chief, Expected To Resign: NYT

Assistant Attorney General of the Criminal Division, Lanny A. Breuer speaks during a news conference at Department of Justice in Washington, Wednesday, Dec. 19, 2012, as . Attorney General Eric Holder and U.S. Commodity Futures Trading Commission enforcement director David Meister listens, during an announcement that the international investment bank UBS Securities Japan Co. Ltd., will pay more than $1.5 billion in penalties in three nations to resolve charges of trying to manipulate an interest rate used as a benchmark in global banking transactions. Holder says UBS Securities Japan Co. Ltd., will plead guilty to felony wire fraud and admit to attempting to manipulate the London Interbank Offered Rate. Two former UBS senior traders will be charged with conspiracy, including one also charged with wire fraud in New York federal court. (AP Photo/Jose Luis Magana)
Assistant Attorney General of the Criminal Division, Lanny A. Breuer speaks during a news conference at Department of Justice in Washington, Wednesday, Dec. 19, 2012, as . Attorney General Eric Holder and U.S. Commodity Futures Trading Commission enforcement director David Meister listens, during an announcement that the international investment bank UBS Securities Japan Co. Ltd., will pay more than $1.5 billion in penalties in three nations to resolve charges of trying to manipulate an interest rate used as a benchmark in global banking transactions. Holder says UBS Securities Japan Co. Ltd., will plead guilty to felony wire fraud and admit to attempting to manipulate the London Interbank Offered Rate. Two former UBS senior traders will be charged with conspiracy, including one also charged with wire fraud in New York federal court. (AP Photo/Jose Luis Magana)

Oct 1 (Reuters) - The head of enforcement at the Commodity Futures Trading Commission, David Meister, is expected to step down as early as Tuesday, the New York Times reported, possibly leaving a leadership vacuum at the agency that regulates the derivatives market.

Meister's departure after nearly three years on the job comes as CFTC Chairman Gary Gensler's five-year term draws to a close at the end of this year. The White House has yet to nominate a candidate to replace Gensler.

Meister, a former federal criminal prosecutor, told the Times he has not started to look for another job.

He told the newspaper he was leaving an invigorated enforcement unit. "We're really in an upward trajectory," he said.

The CFTC, once a sleepy agency overseeing agriculture futures, took on a vastly increased role after the financial crisis. Under Meister, the CFTC filed a record number of actions against the financial industry.

CFTC could not immediately be reached for comment by Reuters outside of regular U.S. business hours.

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