DC

David M. Rubenstein's $2.1 Million Emancipation Proclamation On View At President Lincoln's Cottage

FILE - This undated file photo released by The Carlyle Group shows David M. Rubenstein of the Carlyle Group equity firm. Cong
FILE - This undated file photo released by The Carlyle Group shows David M. Rubenstein of the Carlyle Group equity firm. Congress allocated $7.5 million late in 2011 to repair the damage to the Washington Monument caused by the Aug. 23, 2011, 5.8-magnitude earthquake. Rubenstein tells The Associated Press he felt inspired to help after learning about cracks and chipped stonework high up the 555-foot obelisk and on Thursday, Jan. 18, 2012, will announce he is donating the final $7.5 million needed to repairs cracks atop the monument. (AP Photo/The Carlyle Group, File ) NO SALES

WASHINGTON -- There's a few short days to see the original Emancipation Proclamation, going on view at the National Archives for its 150th anniversary.

The Abraham Lincoln-signed copy of that document bought by David Rubenstein, managing director of The Carlyle Group, for $2.1 million earlier this year will be available to the public a little longer than that.

Rubenstein's copy -- one of 48 "authorized editions" that Lincoln signed in 1864, to be sold at the Philadelphia Great Central Sanitary Fair -- will be shown at President Lincoln’s Cottage through February 2013.

Story continues below...

PHOTO GALLERY
Emancipation Proclamation

It's a fitting place for this display: President Lincoln's Cottage, a 34-room Gothic Revival style house at Armed Forces Retirement Home near D.C.'s Petworth neighborhood, is where Lincoln stayed for stretches of his presidency, and is where he wrote much of the Emancipation Proclamation.

Rubenstein's known for his love of old documents, too. His copy of the Magna Carta -- bought for $23.1 million in 2007 -- is on loan to the National Archives. Rubenstein donated $13.5 million to the Archives, as well, for related conservation and display expenses.

PHOTO GALLERY
1297 Magna Carta Unveiled At National Archives
HuffPost

BEFORE YOU GO