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Deutsche Bank Won't Expand In North Carolina Because Of Anti-LGBT Law

It will keep the 900 jobs already in the state, but won't add the 250 more it had planned on.
John Cryan, co-CEO of Deutsche Bank, addresses a news conference in Frankfurt, Germany, Jan. 28, 2016.
John Cryan, co-CEO of Deutsche Bank, addresses a news conference in Frankfurt, Germany, Jan. 28, 2016.

Add Deutsche Bank to the list of corporations putting pressure on North Carolina politicians to back away from encouraging LGBT discrimination.

The bank announced on Tuesday that it's freezing its plans to add 250 jobs at its software development center in Cary, North Carolina, as a result of the anti-LGBT law the state legislature passed in late March.

"We take our commitment to building inclusive work environments seriously," Deutsche Bank's co-CEO John Cryan said in a statement.

The German bank currently has about 900 employees at its office in Cary. It doesn't plan to move the jobs already located there, but says it won't include North Carolina in its expansion plans through 2017, as it had originally announced back in September.

Deutsche Bank joins PayPal in an economic strike of the state as a result of the law, which strips LGBT people of existing protections against discrimination, and prevents them from being a protected class in future anti-discrimination laws. PayPal has announced it will not go through with a plan to build a 400-employee operations center in the state as a result of the law. 

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