Parenting

Doulas, A Growing Force In Maternity Culture, Seek Greater Acceptance

AURORA, CO (05-04-2006) -- Certified Labor Doula Ana Hill, left, is helping Leanne Stiles prepare for her upcoming birth. Ana assisted Leanne during her first pregnancy too. The word doula comes from the Greek word for the most important female slave or servant in an ancient Greek household, the woman who probably helped the lady of the house through her childbearing. (DENVER POST PHOTO BY KARL GEHRING)  (Photo By Karl Gehring/The Denver Post via Getty Images)
AURORA, CO (05-04-2006) -- Certified Labor Doula Ana Hill, left, is helping Leanne Stiles prepare for her upcoming birth. Ana assisted Leanne during her first pregnancy too. The word doula comes from the Greek word for the most important female slave or servant in an ancient Greek household, the woman who probably helped the lady of the house through her childbearing. (DENVER POST PHOTO BY KARL GEHRING) (Photo By Karl Gehring/The Denver Post via Getty Images)

On the morning of the day Marisa Pizarro gave birth, the usual tumult reigned in her apartment in Lower Manhattan’s financial district. Her husband, a music producer known as J Grand, in shower sandals and gym shorts, was busy tending to their toddler daughter, the financial news on TV and his iPad, where he was still rearranging tracks on a forthcoming release.