Starbucks Pulls Turkey Sandwiches In E. Coli Scare

More than 155,000 products have been recalled from stores including Target, Walmart and 7-11.

Starbucks pulled holiday turkey sandwiches from West Coast stores last week due to potential contamination from celery recalled over a risk of E. coli. At least 19 people were sickened after eating Costco chicken salad that contained the celery products, which hail from California-based Taylor Farms Pacific, Inc.

Starbucks removed sandwiches from 1,347 stores in California, Oregon and Nevada. No illnesses associated with Starbucks' sandwiches have been reported thus far, according to Bloomberg.

The Taylor Farms celery and celery products were also used in a variety of foods sold in Target, Walmart, Sam's Club, 7-Eleven and Safeway. There are more than 155,000 potentially infected products, including chicken salad, tuna salad, celery sticks and wraps.

The Food and Drug Administration has so far recalled related products in Arizona, Arkansas, California,Colorado, Georgia, Hawaii, Idaho, Illinois, Montana, Nebraska, Nevada, New Mexico, North Dakota, Oregon, South Dakota, Utah, Washington and Wyoming.

Escherichia coli are bacteria found in foods, the environment, and in the intestines of humans and animals, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. While many strains of E. coli are harmless, some can cause diarrhea, stomach cramps and vomiting. Most people recover in a week's time, but some infections can be more harmful and potentially life threatening. Young kids, older adults and people with weak immune systems are most at risk.

You can find a full list of recalled products related to this recent outbreak at FDA.gov. If you have any of the products in your home, throw them out or return them to the retailer. Consumers with concerns can call 209-830-3141 Monday to Friday, between the hours of 8 a.m. and 5 p.m. PST. If you have concerns about an illness related to the consumption of one of these products, contact your health care provider immediately.

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