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This Easter, Smash Eggs on Heads (Video)

Cascarones are beautifully colored eggs filled with confetti and small toys traditionally made in Mexico and Central America to celebrate Easter.
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Cascarones (Kas-Ka-ro-nez) are beautifully colored eggs filled with confetti and small toys traditionally made in Mexico and Central America to celebrate Easter. They are often broken over someone's head as a symbol of good luck. The cascaron tradition is said to have begun in Italy using empty eggshells filled with perfumed powder.

Maria Caminos Medina (my aunt-in-law) has kept this family tradition from El Salvador alive in their New Hampshire home for decades. It has now evolved into a multi-generational fiesta attracting family, friends and food. Our family saves from 100 to 300 dozen eggshells over the entire year, all to be enjoyed during one fun-filled and messy afternoon that centers on bringing family and friends together to share food, tradition, bonding and lots of laughter. This is a nice alternative to candy in your kid's Easter Basket.

How to make your own cascarones:

  • Save and properly rinse your broken eggshells (be careful to crack them from the top so that most of the shell is intact, about ½ inch hole)
  • Make sure to remove thin membrane inside of egg shell.
  • Let shells dry after being rinsed.
  • Dye, paint or color your eggs (get creative and include the kids)
  • Once they've dried, fill the eggs with confetti and/or small toys.
  • Seal the top hole with colored tissue paper and glue, finish decorating.
  • Let dry and enjoy!

Find more videos about parenting and food on parentearth.com.

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