WOMEN

14 Famous Women Who Know You Deserve Equal Pay

Here's to getting paid what you're worth. đź’°đź’°đź’°
From Queen B to Melissa Harris-Perry and Jessica Chastain  -- these women are demanding they be paid what they're worth.
From Queen B to Melissa Harris-Perry and Jessica Chastain  -- these women are demanding they be paid what they're worth. 

It's 2016 and women are still paid less than their male counterparts. 

On average, women make 79 cent to every dollar a man makes. Black and Latina women are hit the hardest by the pay gap with Black women making 64 cents and Latina women making 54 cents to every white man's dollar. The way things are going, women won't have pay equality until 2058. 

This is completely unacceptable -- and a few badass celebrities are letting the world know they won't tolerate such blatant sexism. 

To celebrate Equal Pay Day on April 12, we've rounded up 14 famous women who know you deserve equal pay. From pop stars to Oscar winners, these women are demanding women be paid what they're worth. 

  • 1 Viola Davis
    In a 2016&nbsp;interview with <a href="http://mashable.com/2016/02/25/viola-davis-interview/#R4h060ZHJiql" target="_blank">Ma
    Getty Images
    In a 2016 interview with Mashable, Viola Davis discussed the pay gap and how a big fight for women of color is first to be paid equally to her white female counterparts. "With me as an actress of color, I have to say to probably contradict myself, that [the pay gap is] not something I think about on a daily basis," she said. "Because the struggle for us as women of color is just to be seen the same as our white female counterparts."

    "What are you telling your daughter when she grows up?" Davis added. "'You've got to just understand that you’re a girl. You have a vagina, so that’s not as valuable.'"

    Head over to Mashable to read Davis' full interview. 
  • 2 Sandra Bullock
    In a 2015 interview with <a href="http://variety.com/2015/film/news/hollywood-gender-pay-gap-inequality-1201636553/" target="
    Getty Images
    In a 2015 interview with Variety, Sandra Bullock discussed why we need more than equal pay to truly level the playing field for women in Hollywood. “It’s a bigger issue than money,” she said. “I know we’re focused on the money part right now. That’s just a byproduct.”

    “Once we start shifting how we perceive women and stop thinking about them as ‘less than,’ the pay disparity will take care of itself," Bullock said. 

    Head here to read the rest of the interview. 
  • 3 BeyoncĂ©
    In a recent interview with <a href="https://www.huffpost.com/entry/beyonc%C3%A9s-first-in-depth-interview-in-years-is-all-abo
    Getty Images
    In a recent interview with ELLE, Beyoncé made her views on gender inequality and the pay gap very clear. "When we talk about equal rights, there are issues that face women disproportionately," Bey said. "If your son can do it, your daughter should be able to." 

    The feminist pop star wrote about this same issue in 2014 in a powerful essay for The Shriver Report. "Today, women make up half of the U.S. workforce, but the average working woman earns only 77 percent of what the average working man makes. But unless women and men both say this is unacceptable, things will not change," Bey wrote. "Equality will be achieved when men and women are granted equal pay and equal respect."

    Head over to ELLE to read the rest of Beyoncé’s interview. 
  • 4 Carli Lloyd
    In April, star midfielder of&nbsp;the U.S.&nbsp;Women's National Soccer&nbsp;team <a href="https://www.huffpost.com/entry/car
    Getty Images
    In April, star midfielder of the U.S. Women's National Soccer team Carli Lloyd wrote a powerful op-ed in The New York Times addressing the wage gap that exists between women pro soccer players and their male counterparts. The essay was published just a month after five players from the U.S. national women's team filed a wage-discrimination complaint against U.S. Soccer. 

    "We can’t right all the world’s wrongs, but we’re totally determined to right the unfairness in our field, not just for ourselves but for the young players coming up behind us and for our soccer sisters around the world," Lloyd wrote. "Simply put, we’re sick of being treated like second-class citizens. It wears on you after a while. And we are done with it." 

    Head over to The New York Times to read Lloyd's full essay. 
  • 5 Melissa Harris-Perry
    In a <a href="https://www.huffpost.com/entry/melissa-harris-perry-tax-day-pay-gap-men-women_n_3080983">2013 segment of her fo
    Getty Images
    In a 2013 segment of her former MSNBC show, Melissa Harris-Perry broke down exactly why it's so important that we close the wage gap. 

    “Seventy-seven is how many cents women working full time currently make for every dollar men are paid. $11,084 is the yearly wage gap created by that pay deficit between full-time working men and women,” Harris-Perry said. “Sixty-four cents is how much African-American women are paid for every dollar men earn, showing that women of color are more impacted by these unequal pay disparities.”

    Watch the full segment here
  • 6 Emma Watson
    In a March 2016 interview with Esquire, <a href="https://www.huffpost.com/entry/feel-free-to-call-emma-watson-a-feminazi_n_56
    Getty Images
    In a March 2016 interview with Esquire, Emma Watson discussed the gender pay gap and reminded everyone why it's so important to speak up about. "We are not supposed to talk about money, because people will think you’re 'difficult' or a 'diva,'" Watson said.  

    Head over to Esquire to read Watson's full interview. 
  • 7 Jennifer Lawrence
    In an October 2015 essay for&nbsp;Lena Dunham&rsquo;s Lenny Letter, <a href="http://www.lennyletter.com/work/a147/jennifer-la
    Getty Images
    In an October 2015 essay for Lena Dunham’s Lenny Letter, Jennifer Lawrence wrote about her experience with pay inequality. She wrote that she didn’t want to be deemed “difficult” or “spoiled” by demanding more money. 

    "When the Sony hack happened and I found out how much less I was being paid than the lucky people with dicks, I didn't get mad at Sony," Lawrence wrote. "I got mad at myself. I failed as a negotiator because I gave up early."

    “I’m over trying to find the ‘adorable’ way to state my opinion and still be likable! Fuck that,” she wrote.

    Read the rest of Lawrence's essay here
  • 8 Nicki Minaj
    In a May 2015 interview with Cosmopolitan, Nicki Minaj urged young women to talk&nbsp;about how much they're paid in order to
    Getty Images
    In a May 2015 interview with Cosmopolitan, Nicki Minaj urged young women to talk about how much they're paid in order to close the wage gap. 

    "Women are uncomfortable talking about money. I know it's taboo to discuss it at work," Minaj said. "You have to ask questions. 'What is this person getting?' Do your research. I've always been pretty competitive in terms of my pay."

    Head over to Cosmo to read Minaj's full interview. 
  • 9 Jessica Chastain
    Jessica Chastain spoke out in support of Jennifer Lawrence's essay on the wage gap in a 2015 interview with <a href="http://v
    Getty Images
    Jessica Chastain spoke out in support of Jennifer Lawrence's essay on the wage gap in a 2015 interview with Variety. "There’s no excuse," Chastain said. "There’s no reason why [Jennifer Lawrence] should be doing a film with other actors and get paid less than her male costars. It's completely unfair." 

    In an October 2015 interview with The Huffington Post, Chastain added that she's experienced the gender wage gap herself. "Someone wrote an article once that said I made a certain amount of money for ‘The Martian.’... I made less than a quarter of that in reality, so there is a huge wage gap in the industry," she said.

    Head over to Variety to read the rest of Chastain's interview.
  • 10 Salma Hayek
    At Variety's Power of Women luncheon in October 2015, Salma Hayek gave a riveting speech on gender equality and the importanc
    Getty Images
    At Variety's Power of Women luncheon in October 2015, Salma Hayek gave a riveting speech on gender equality and the importance of closing the wage gap. "[Women] are 66 percent of the work power of the world. However, we only get 10 percent of the income of the world," she said. "This is really, really sad and tragic." 

    "We are such an economical power, women in the country," she added. "We represent such a strong part of the audience that they cannot ignore us anymore."

    Head over to Access Hollywood to read the rest of Hayek's remarks. 
  • 11 Judy Greer
    In an op-ed for Glamour, <a href="https://www.huffpost.com/entry/judy-greer-pay-gap-glamour_n_7224226">Judy Greer called bull
    Getty Images
    In an op-ed for Glamour, Judy Greer called bullshit on the gender pay gap. “In the past few months, I’ve become convinced of one thing: If I were a man, I’d be paid more,” she wrote. 

    "In Hollywood I can continue to fight for more movies and TV shows -- with bigger budgets -- that value women," Greer wrote. "Women who are more than arm candy. Women who are layered and flawed, just like us. Women who kick ass. And yes, women who get paid for it.” 

    Head to Glamour to read Greer's full essay.
  • 12 Rosario Dawson
    In a November 2015 interview with MTV, Rosario Dawson talked about how&nbsp;the pay gap is different for women of color. "It&
    Getty Images
    In a November 2015 interview with MTV, Rosario Dawson talked about how the pay gap is different for women of color. "It’s a very complex situation when you think about what are black women making in comparison to white women, what are Latin women making, what are Asian women making in comparison," she said. "And it gets even more convoluted."

    "Male, female, young or old, when people aren’t properly being paid for the job, what that does for their children and their access and opportunities… it just builds up," Dawson added. "Generationally we’re impacting people and I hope that that changes."

    Head over to MTV to read the rest of Dawson's interview. 
  • 13 Carey Mulligan
    In a November 2015 interview with <a href="http://deadline.com/2015/11/carey-mulligan-suffragette-interview-feminism-jennifer
    Getty Images
    In a November 2015 interview with Deadline, Carey Mulligan applauded Jennifer Lawrence for speaking up about the wage gap. 

    "I think it’s a good thing for someone like Jennifer to speak out; it means an awful lot to women," Mulligan said. "...[The discrepancy] is inherently unfair and she has an enormous platform to speak out against it. Men in Hollywood look up to her because she is powerful. She’s using that platform to correct something that isn’t right."

    Head over to Deadline to read the entire interview. 
  • 14 Patricia Arquette
    In her <a href="https://www.huffpost.com/entry/patricia-arquette-best-supporting-actress_n_6715610">now-iconic acceptance spe
    Getty Images
    In her now-iconic acceptance speech after winning an Oscar for Best Supporting Actress in 2015, Patricia Arquette made a passionate plea to close the pay gap. 

    Arquette expanded on her speech in a November 2015 interview with The Huffington Post. “Basically what I was saying is I don’t know why women are never a part of the conversation,” she said. “The women’s movement hasn’t moved at all. ... We don’t talk about women at all. They’re the invisible part of our whole nation, so I was appealing to our great activist leaders to help women, to remember us, to lend their hand, and maybe that’s not my place to say.”

    Head here to hear more from Arquette's follow-up interview. 
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