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Fishing After the Tsunami

In 2004, the Tsunami that hit Sri Lanka killed eight members of this small fishing family. Yet today they still fish, because they have to do it to survive.
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Sri Lankan fishermen pull a fishing net on the beach in the southern Sri Lankan town of Galle on April 12, 2012, a day after residents along the country's coast were asked to move inland following a tsunami alert. Sri Lanka on April 11 lifted the tsunami alert issued after an undersea earthquake in Indonesia had sparked fears of giant waves hitting coasts across the Indian Ocean, the government said. AFP PHOTO / Ishara S. KODIKARA (Photo credit should read Ishara S. KODIKARA/AFP/Getty Images)
Sri Lankan fishermen pull a fishing net on the beach in the southern Sri Lankan town of Galle on April 12, 2012, a day after residents along the country's coast were asked to move inland following a tsunami alert. Sri Lanka on April 11 lifted the tsunami alert issued after an undersea earthquake in Indonesia had sparked fears of giant waves hitting coasts across the Indian Ocean, the government said. AFP PHOTO / Ishara S. KODIKARA (Photo credit should read Ishara S. KODIKARA/AFP/Getty Images)

In 2004, the Tsunami that hit Sri Lanka killed eight members of this small fishing family. And yet today they still fish (either on stilts or in a boat), because they have to do it to survive. The family lives in a small, makeshift hut with a back "window" that opens onto the ocean -- the same sea that gives life also takes it away.

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