TV & Film

'Friday Night Lights' Movie Kickstarter? Adrienne Palicki Hints At Project

FILE - This 2006 photo, provided by NBC Universal, shows actors Connie Britton, standing center left, as Tami Taylor, Kyle Chandler, foreground, as Eric Taylor in the NBC series "Friday Night Lights." Mitt Romney is giving a campaign-trail twist to an inspirational slogan from the TV series "Friday Night Lights" as he rides an upswing in polls after last week’s debate. The coach of the football team at fictional West Dillon High School in rural Texas would build up the Panthers by saying, "Clear eyes, full hearts, can't lose!" “Friday Night Lights” aired on NBC and DirectTV over five years, ending last year, and remains a Romney favorite. (AP Photo/NBC, Bill Records)
FILE - This 2006 photo, provided by NBC Universal, shows actors Connie Britton, standing center left, as Tami Taylor, Kyle Chandler, foreground, as Eric Taylor in the NBC series "Friday Night Lights." Mitt Romney is giving a campaign-trail twist to an inspirational slogan from the TV series "Friday Night Lights" as he rides an upswing in polls after last week’s debate. The coach of the football team at fictional West Dillon High School in rural Texas would build up the Panthers by saying, "Clear eyes, full hearts, can't lose!" “Friday Night Lights” aired on NBC and DirectTV over five years, ending last year, and remains a Romney favorite. (AP Photo/NBC, Bill Records)

Former series star Adrienne Palicki spilled the beans to Screenrant about the potential route the much-discussed movie could be taking.

"I think they’re starting the Kickstarter, which is insane ... I have multiple feelings on it. I love it so much and I’m afraid that a movie might ruin it and I don’t want that to happen," Palicki said.

"Friday Night Lights" ended its TV run in 2010 after five seasons on NBC/DirecTV and talk of a movie followup quickly began in July 2011. Since then, there's been little progress -- besides several of the stars discussing it -- but with the success the "Veronica Mars" movie had via Kickstarter, several creators of cult-hit shows have been exploring that option to revive their fan favorite creations.

"I think that cult hits is exactly what our model works for," "Veronica Mars" creator Rob Thomas told The Huffington Post about other show revivals via Kickstarter. "I think an 'Arrested Development' movie could've been done this way without a doubt. I think we're the perfect example of this. I don't think it would work nearly as well with a new product, with something that didn't have a brand identity, something that didn't have built-in fans."

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