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The 'Full House' Family Would Be Shocked At How Much Their Home Rents For Now

You can live out your ‘90s sitcom dreams in this San Francisco home -- if you can afford it.
The San Francisco home from the '90s sitcom "Full House" is now available to rent, but there aren't many people who could afford the staggering $14,000 monthly rent.
The San Francisco home from the '90s sitcom "Full House" is now available to rent, but there aren't many people who could afford the staggering $14,000 monthly rent.

You can now rent the San Francisco home where the fictional Tanner clan “lived,” but only if you’ve got $13,950 to spend each month.

The home made famous in the show “Full House” is being offered for rent by Vanguard Properties. Built in 1883, the Italianate Victorian is 3,000 square feet and comes with three bedrooms and three-and-a-half bathrooms.

The property managers are also supplying a gardener to take care of the manicured backyard, and the kitchen comes with a “full-size wine refrigerator” ― a luxury amenity that Danny, D.J., Stephanie, Michelle, Uncle Jesse and Uncle Joey definitely didn’t have.

The kitchen of the home on Broderick Street in San Francisco. The interior design in the listing photos looks drastically different than the interior set used on "Full House." 
The kitchen of the home on Broderick Street in San Francisco. The interior design in the listing photos looks drastically different than the interior set used on "Full House." 

A shot of the home’s exterior appeared in the “Full House” opening credits and is fixed in the mind of anyone who watched the show during its run from 1987 to 1995 ― or the reruns that have been airing for the last two decades.

Though the show’s interior scenes were shot elsewhere, fans still make pilgrimages to the house on Broderick Street. That feature isn’t mentioned in the rental listing.

Netflix released the reboot “Fuller House” earlier this year, and it’s been renewed for a second season. In the new version, D.J. Tanner raises her three sons in the same house.

Danny Tanner, a local morning show host, likely couldn’t afford the home’s current rent, even with help from his musician brother and his comedian best friend. To make enough money for the $14,000 rent to be considered affordable, your household income would have to be over $550,000. Though many people spend more, the common standard for what qualifies as affordable housing costs is 30 percent or less of a family’s income.

Though the price is abnormally high, it underscores the skyrocketing rental prices in San Francisco. The metro area’s median rent for a two-bedroom apartment was $4,800 last month.

The influx of wealthier tech workers and lack of affordable places to live has housing advocates increasingly concerned about evictions and gentrification in the city. Those issues were highlighted in an AJ+ video earlier this year that spoofed the “Full House” intro ― or “Unaffordable House,” in their version. Unaffordable is right.

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