NYC

G Train Service Could Be A Lot Less Frustrating If MTA Finds $700,000

NEW YORK, NY - DECEMBER 05: A train arrives at a stop in Brooklyn two days after a man was pushed to his death in front of a
NEW YORK, NY - DECEMBER 05: A train arrives at a stop in Brooklyn two days after a man was pushed to his death in front of a train on December 5, 2012 in New York City. The incident was caught by a photographer and has since raised questions as to why someone didn't help the man before the train struck him. The New York City subway system, with 468 stations in operation, is the most extensive public transportation system in the world. It is also one of the world's oldest public transit systems, with the first underground line of the subway opening on October 27, 1904. (Photo by Spencer Platt/Getty Images)

All of Brooklyn's complaining, clever ridiculing, and immeasurable patience may soon pay off.

The MTA is pledging to bring increased service to the much-maligned G train during prime hours, with trains running every 8 minutes instead of 10.

The proposal-- as WNYC notes, in an effort to curtail the "G train sprint"-- also calls for making trains stop at the same section of the platform on weeknights and weekdays. The MTA would also install signs to to better direct straphangers to the correct stopping positions.

"Now G train riders will be en route to much-needed relief that may one day lead to the G meaning great," said state Senator Daniel Squadron in a statement. "These recommendations will allow the G to keep pace with skyrocketing growth in Brooklyn and Queens – and make the notorious Train Sprint a thing of the past."

All of these improvements, however, are contingent upon the agency successfully securing $700,000 in funding.

The MTA tweeted out the potential plan on Monday, along with results stemming from a comprehensive review of the line:

The study found that while ridership remains relatively low compared to other subway lines in the city, adjustments are needed to compensate for shared tracks with the F train and overcrowding.

Often cited as a "lifeline" for Brooklyn commuters, the train has long frustrated straphangers with its infrequency.

Some have even blamed the G for sabotaging romances.

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