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Money

Gasoline Black Market Emerges In Sandy's Wake

UNION, NJ - OCTOBER 31:  Customers line up to refill gasoline tanks along Route 22, October 31, 2012 in Union, New Jersey.  Though nearly lined with gas stations, only two had both electricity and fuel to dispense as residents contiue to cope with widespread damage and region-wide power outages resulting from Hurricane Sandy.  (Photo by Jeff Zelevansky/Getty Images)
UNION, NJ - OCTOBER 31: Customers line up to refill gasoline tanks along Route 22, October 31, 2012 in Union, New Jersey. Though nearly lined with gas stations, only two had both electricity and fuel to dispense as residents contiue to cope with widespread damage and region-wide power outages resulting from Hurricane Sandy. (Photo by Jeff Zelevansky/Getty Images)

As gasoline prices plummet nationwide, a gas black market is emerging in Hurricane Sandy's wake.

Despite promises that gas supplies would rebound and long lines at the pump would dissipate, the gas shortage plaguing New York and New Jersey has caused some people to take matters into their own hands, buying and selling gas online via Craigslist for up to $30 a gallon.

One person claiming to be "an upstate New York contractor" posted Sunday that he would be delivering gas to Brooklyn, N.Y., selling 5-gallon containers for $150 (h/t Business Insider).

An ad placed in New York promised speedy delivery of 87 octane gas for $20 a gallon -- “NO water in it!!!”, the ad proclaimed. Another person in New Jersey was selling 5-gallon cans for $45 a piece.

Tension is running high due to the gas shortage. In Queens, N.Y. a man was arrested for allegedly pointing a gun at another motorist in line at a gas station. In New Jersey on Sunday, gas station lines were as long as half a mile.

Many frustrated New Yorkers have taken to Twitter to voice their outrage:

Gasoline isn’t the only black market to emerge after the storm. After Sandy hit, street stands in lower Manhattan were selling hurricane necessities well above market price, with small flashlights selling for around $10 and candles were going for $4.

For those who want to stick to more traditional ways of getting gas, crowdsourcing online could be one of the best ways to figure out where gas is available. Twitter accounts such as @brooklyngas and @njgas have been created to help provide information on where to find gas.

Here's a round-up of some of the insane price gouging we've seen online:

Price Gouging Ads