Dmitry Markov/Ismail Ferdous/Adriana Zehbrauskas

Photographers Around The World Are Using Instagram To Document Underrepresented Communities

From Bangladesh to Brazil to Russia, these three photographers are using Instagram for good.

Instagram is a tool often credited for helping to democratize the field of photography, giving visibility to the amateur artists and photographers who otherwise lack a platform to showcase their work.

Yes, many people use the app to share images of perfectly organized brunch dishes, candid shots of their cats and a bevy of selfies, flooding feeds everywhere and amounting to a saturated field of expressive shots. But others are using Instagram to put a face to the communities that surround them, capturing local people and groups who rarely show up in mainstream media coverage.

Getty Images, a photo service that predates the rise of social media, has not let Instagram's impact go unnoticed. The two have recently teamed up to launch an inaugural grant program aimed at rewarding photographers who are documenting the everyday lives of underrepresented groups around the globe. This year, they received more than 1,200 entries from photographers in 190 different countries, eventually choosing three recipients of the first Getty Images Instagram Grant who exemplify both exceptional photographic technique and storytelling ability.

Winning photographers Ismail Ferdous of Bangladesh, Adriana Zehbrauskas of Brazil and Dmitry Markov of Russia each received $10,000 from Getty and Instagram and the opportunity to engage with mentors from the judging panel. Those judges include National Geographic Photography Fellow David Guttenfelder, Director of Photography and Visual Enterprise for TIME Kira Pollack, documentary photographer Maggie Steber, documentary photographer Malin Fezehai, and co-founder of @EverydayIran and documentary photographer Ramin Talaie.

Getty and Instagram also recognized the work of five other photographers worthy of mention -- Tasneem Asultan from UAE; Kevin Cook from the U.S.; Igor Pisuk from Sweden; Cassandra Giraldo from the U.S. and Ako Salemi from Iran -- all of whom will also receive mentorship from a member of the Getty Instagram Grant judging team.

New Yorkers will be able to see the work of Ferdous, Zehbrauskas and Markov at the upcoming Photoville event in NYC. But for those not in the city, here's a preview of the winning photographers' works (along with their biographies courtesy of Getty Images Instagram Grant), featuring the faces of underrepresented people who deserve your attention.

To see more of the work of these three winners, check out their Instagram accounts: @afterranaplaza, @dcim.ru and @adrianazehbrauskas.

Ismail Ferdous: For his project "After Rana Plaza," which highlights the surviving relatives of those killed in collapse of the Rana Plaza garment factory in Dhaka, Bangladesh.
afterranaplaza/Instagram "Born in Dhaka, Bangladesh in 1989, Ismail Ferdous has always been fascinated by the stories of people living in underrepresented communities. As a documentary photographer, Ismail covers social and humanitarian issues. His most recent project "The Cost of Fashion" is a photo and video advocacy project that began after he documented the Rana Plaza factory collapse, which led to his follow-up project two years later "After Rana Plaza." The project continues to spread awareness about the fashion industry and its negative effects on workers in Bangladesh. Since 2011, Ismail has also documented the effects of global warming and HIV/AIDS on local communities. Additionally, he has documented violence against women in Guatemala, refugees along the border of Turkey and Syria, human trafficking in South-East Asia and, most recently, the earthquake in Nepal. Ismail has worked for many NGOs, agencies and news organizations including MSNBC, Al Jazeera, Associated Press, Showtime, the World Bank, SIDA-Global Reporting and Ocean Conservancy. He has won numerous awards including NPPA’s Best of Photojournalism award (2014 and 2015), Days Japan Photojournalism Award, Alexia Foundation Award of Excellence in 2012, Dart Foundation Asia Pacific Fellowship, Eddie Adams Workshop and World Bank Young Artist. Ismail’s work is exhibited in the 25CPW Gallery New York, the World Bank head office, the Powerhouse Museum and Rio de Janeiro-UNICEF. His work has appeared in The New York Times Op-Docs, New Yorker Magazine, National Geographic Germany, Global Reporting Sweden, OmVärlden magazine, The Washington Post, TIME LightBox, The New York Times Lens blog, Wall Street Journal, InterAction Magazine and MIPJ journal."
Dmitry Markov: For spotlighting the orphaned children who reside in Pskov, Russia.

A photo posted by Dmitry Markov (@dcim.ru) on

A photo posted by Dmitry Markov (@dcim.ru) on

A photo posted by Dmitry Markov (@dcim.ru) on

A photo posted by Dmitry Markov (@dcim.ru) on

A photo posted by Dmitry Markov (@dcim.ru) on

A photo posted by Dmitry Markov (@dcim.ru) on

A photo posted by Dmitry Markov (@dcim.ru) on

A photo posted by Dmitry Markov (@dcim.ru) on

A photo posted by Dmitry Markov (@dcim.ru) on

A photo posted by Dmitry Markov (@dcim.ru) on

dcim.ru/Instagram "Dmitry (Dima) Markov lives in the northwestern city of Pskov, Russia, where he works with disabled children and volunteers for organizations providing support services to orphans. Dima describes his own childhood as directionless until he discovered his passion for journalism at age sixteen. Now, as a professional photographer, Dima focuses on documenting the social issues close to his heart. His Instagram account features powerful portraits of the people he encounters everyday in places like railway stations and street markets."
Adriana Zehbrauskas: For her work documenting climate change and the everyday lives of Latin Americans.

A photo posted by BuzzFeed World (@world) on

A photo posted by LensCulture (@lensculture) on

A photo posted by LensCulture (@lensculture) on

A photo posted by LensCulture (@lensculture) on

adrianazehbrauskas/Instagram "Adriana Zehbrauskas was born in Sao Paulo, Brazil. A freelance documentary photographer based in Mexico City for the past 10 years, Adriana has extensively covered issues related to the Mexican drug war, migration and religion. She works mainly in Mexico, Central and South America and contributes regularly to The The New York Times. Her work has also featured in Leica Fotografie International, National Geographic Brasil, Vice, Du, Newsweek, Time, The Wall Street Journal, The Guardian and Le Monde, among others. She is represented by Polaris Images in New York, and is one of the three photographers profiled in the documentary “Beyond Assignment” (USA, 2011). The film was produced by The Knight Center for International Media and the University of Miami and features her “Tepito; Barrio Bravo” project. This work was also published as an e-book by Cristal de Luz. Adriana’s mobile photography work was selected by Time Magazine for the “29 Instagrams That Defined the World in 2014”; she was the recipient of the Troféu Mulher Imprensa (photojournalist newspaper/magazine) 2012 and was a finalist for the New York Photo Awards in 2009 and 2010. Her project on Faith in Brazil and Mexico was awarded an Art & Worship World Prize by the Niavaran Artistic Creation Foundation."

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