HUFFINGTON POST

Underwater Discoveries Off Greek Island Give Clues About Ancient City

Submerged ruins, columns and a shipwreck point to unknown treasure in the waters around Delos.
Divers inspect relics off the Greek island of Delos.
Divers inspect relics off the Greek island of Delos.

Archaeologists discovered a shipwreck earlier this month off the Greek island of Delos, which was a sanctuary dedicated to the Greek gods Apollo and Artemis during the classical period of Greek antiquity between the fourth and fifth centuries B.C.

The site was a major commercial hub in the first century B.C., bustling with people and trade.

Ceramic artifacts found in the Greek-Roman wreckage.
Ceramic artifacts found in the Greek-Roman wreckage.

Researchers from the French Archaeological School at Athens and Greece’s Ephorate of Underwater Antiquities worked together on an underwater excavation between Sept. 5 and 15, discovering well-preserved objects dating back to the Greek-Roman period inside a submerged shipwreck. Delos, a small island, is just two miles southwest of the famous tourist attractions of Mykonos.

Building remains, including about twenty fragments of columns and pillars, were found a little further north.

A column to the west of a bulwark found deep underwater.
A column to the west of a bulwark found deep underwater.

The relics appear to be public buildings, according to Angeliki Simosi, director of the Ephorate of Underwater Antiquities.

The discoveries reveal a great deal of new information about the island’s port infrastructure and buildings, Simosi told Koini Gnomi, a local newspaper.

Simosi pointed out that the finds will help archaeologists reconstruct the map of ancient Delos with more accuracy.

“The benefits of this investigation are great,” she said.

CONVERSATIONS